The Pelago Path Racer

Well, I am afraid that I will spoil the big surprise by posting this.

As you know there are one project that I have been working on for a long time. Many other projects has crossed my way since I started searching for parts to my “project”. But now, at last it is finally complete. You might know after reading and following my blog that I, for a long time had an vision to have a old bicycle. But since old bicycles often are in need of constant service, and even sometimes are rare and expensive (I know since I have vintage bicycles too). That made me look for all sorts of modern bicycle brands and models. I realized quickly that modern ones did not quite cut the mustard for me in either design, style or”feel”. After a long search on internet I found that the Finnish made Pelago bicycles was the ones I was looking for. More specific the model the calls “Bristol”. It is a classical looking bicycle in a roadster style, black colour, nice details in lugs and frame work, simple but still vintage looking. While I was looking around and searching I noticed the Pashely Guvnor and was hooked right away by the design of the “path racer” from the -30’s. I started to think how the Guvnor was made, designed and found out that it was just a regular frame slightly changed and modified, but was still keeping the standard look.
I could not stop thinking of the great style of the Path racers and the way Pashely made the Govnor.
After a while I decided to simply build one myself. I just needed a good frame to start with. I started more and more to like the look of an path racer with the turned down handlebars, no mud guards, no chain guard. A really fast looking one, but made with vintage parts. I decided to give it a go and that I would go all the way with this one. It was going to be 100% perfect in my taste. I had time on my hands so there was no rush. The deadline was set so I could enter the Bike in Tweed event for 2014. The Pashely Guvnor was a great inspiration in all the process. But I wanted something different. Something in a more “less is more” style or simply in “my” style. But sadly I could not attend the 2014 event. So everything was put on ice for a moment.
After listening and talking to people I found out that there was going to be an 2015 event of Bike in Tweed. Then I suddenly got about a year to build and finish it to the 2015 event. That became my new goal!

Last summer I visited Pelago while I was on vacation in Helsinki. They was very kind and helped me out with the frame, I also bought the pedals at the Pelago shop (so to be honest the bicycle started out as a pair of pedals). I later bought front and back wheels from a friend that had a set of brand new wheels in spare, he also had an seat post that fitted the Pelago frame that I bought. The saddle, the complete front break system, handlebars and the grips was found on internet auctions.
The stem was an adventure by it self. I found a special made one in United Kingdom that I bought. But that one did not fit the look at all, so I found a old one I had in a locker down in the cellar. That one fitted like a charm. The bell comes from UK and has a lovely tone. I found the crank set in Australia, the chain are from Germany, so are the tires and tubes.
It is an truly international bicycle. But in a European style, perhaps even a Nordic style. So I collected parts for about 6 months for this bicycle, time was not an issue. I had more than a year to get it ready.

Now it is done!

I will present the bicycle better as soon as the winter turns in to spring and the weather is nicer. It is a user bicycle, but I like to take good photos in good conditions. But for now, here is a photo from the hallway. I will also present all the bicycles. It is getting rather confusing now with all projects. At least it is confusing for me.

pelago_sch

Advertisements

Happening in white

Today when I was down in the basement, searching for some old books I had in storage there. While I was there I took a look at the old Monark bicycle that I re-build earlier a few months ago. The one that was going to be the “silver arrow racer”. That I was going to build but never got around to do it. I had to move the white Monark out of the way to access the drawer with all the books. When I was going to put the bicycle back I got the idea of checking out the air in the tires. I remember the seller telling me that the bicycle needed new tires and tubes since there was no air in them. But after filling the tubes with air at the time of the re-build earlier. It was still air in the tubes today! The ires are bad, but that has to do with that they are rather inexpensive. But they do their job. Then I got a silly idea.
Why not try the Monark out, just to see if all parts are in place and works as they should.

I brought it out on to the street and looked at it in the sunlight. Well, to be honest. It is a bit scruffy and dirty. But it sure is a looker. There is a certain “cool” look about the old bicycle. If it was a car it would perhaps be called a sleeper. Beaten up, but a real racer underneath. First I started by putting my right trouser leg inside of my sock. We used to do back when I was a kid. After all, I have no chain guard, so a trouser leg fluttering in the wind might be problems waiting to happen. So with my trousers securely tucked in my sock I mounted the bicycle and put the right foot on the pedal and pushed away.

I need to mention that the streets here are now covered with a layer of snow and ice. Also the tires on the Monark is old, inexpensive summer tires. The first thing that happened was that the rear wheel started to spin when I pushed away, no traction at all. But with some technique and routine from the youth when I was riding bicycles all year around I quickly got some speed. The ride felt really nice, a but bit unusual  for me with the low handlebar position. Last time I had a racer bicycle was about 24 years ago (that one was scrapped after a nasty fall in high speed). So it was a simple matter of adjusting the riding position for me, riding low, riding fast. The saddle is a bit worn, so I am thinking of replacing it with an Brooks saddle I have laying around. It could be great. It was fun to suddenly after so many years remember how to ride a bicycle in snow again. Skidding along the road with those cheep low profile tires, making rear wheel braking into a action filled event.

I am looking forward to this summer, I will ride the Monark often. Just for fun!
But I realized that I had completely forgotten about the headlight. I was planning to fix it so it did not need a dynamo to get the light going. I was thinking of building in a battery inside the headlight housing. It was a really cheep lamp so if it breaks, no big problem. But the Monark looks really great with that big head light mounted. So now in the winter it is a perfect time to try to solve that puzzle.

After trying the bicycle for a short time. I took a photo of it so I could write a new post for you readers. After all, it was a long time I wrote here. I am sorry for that. But it is winter here in Sweden. Snow and ice are not so great for bicycles. Let us be honest. It is more fun to ride along in the summer and to take photos with old cameras.

By the way, I heard a rumour earlier. It was one of the Bike In Tweed organisers that talked about the event this year. They are thinking of having it at the regular date, that is the  first (or second) weekend in October as it was before. That is just great! Let us all hope for great weather so all nice bicycles and owners will be there this year. See you there perhaps?

 

IMG_4277_sch