Uppsala Vintage Biking, (Punschrundan 2020)

On Sunday 7th of June 2020, Uppsala Vintage Biking arranged their summer event called “Punschrundan” (the punsch route). Due to the current virus situation in the world and also following recommendations from the government, the Organizer decided to allow only 20 participants in this event and using a booking system on Facebook. The slots filled up quickly and soon all 20 slots were booked.

On the day of the event I took my trusty old Hermes bicycle to the local commuter train, bought a ticket and went on to the platform. The last time I went to Uppsala for a vintage tweed event, there were other tweedians onboard the same train that I entered. This time I looked around onboard the train, perhaps I was not alone? Sadly, I did not see anyone else wearing tweed, standing by a vintage bicycle on the train. Never mind, I had my phone and headset with me, the journey to Uppsala railway station went quickly by while I was listening to my own “smoke rings” Spotify playlist with 30 hours swing, jazz and dance music from 1930’s and 1940’s. A perfect tweed ride playlist to set the mood.


Taking the bicycle on the train is really a great thing to do. Sadly there are not many operators in Sweden that allows bicycles onboard trains.

The weather was perfect for a tweed ride. Not to sunny, hot or cold. It was “lagom” as we say in Swedish. That is what I understand a very unique word that only exists in the Swedish language. It roughly means “enough”, but in a pleased way. The weather was lagom warm, it was just about right. Or, perfect for the situation. The Eskimos has one hundred words for snow, swedes has one word for one hundred different moods. All depending on how you pronounce it.

When upon arriving at Uppsala railway station and disembarking the train, there were still no other tweedians in sight, oh well. Since it was a few years ago I had been to central Uppsala I thought I knew my way to the meeting point at Fyristorg, an classic square, perhaps most known for being mentioned in one of the earliest Swedish rock and roll songs. Hot dog boogie, a song about a hot dog sales man who was standing on that square being sad.

After a short ride, a feeling of going the wrong way emerged. I decided to check the directions in my phone. Of course, I had turned right at the crossroads earlier instead of turning left. A simple and easy mistake to make. Right? No left. I should had turned left instead of right, right? No, left. What?

When arriving at Fyristorg there were other tweedians already there. There were the gang that I knew from other events. Hello, how charming to meet you again! It turned out that we had arrived with the same train, but I had never seen them.


Arriving at Fyristorg


Inspecting and admiring bicycles

The Organizer came along and greeted everyone. The route for the day was riding along Fyrisån, the stream that flows in the middle of Uppsala. The ride was following the stream south, in to the city park and further down to a bird sanctuary and lovely nature. Along the way we were guided and told interesting and funny anecdotes about the areas we stopped by.


The riders at the first stop of the route


Heading along while listening to the birds chirping and the peaceful sound of tires rolling against gravel

At the first stop, a lady had some problems with her saddle. I helped her, the seat had come loose. But in my toolbox I had a bicycle tool that sorted the issue in a jiffy. Then we headed onwards on narrow paths in the woods.

Suddenly there was an mishap. The lady that had problems with the bicycle seat had a flat tire. I decided to try to act as a amateur bicycle repair man, but quickly noticed that the tire valve on the front wheel were faulty, when removing the valve I noticed that the original rubber seal from the 1940’s had totally disintegrated. Did anyone have an spare valve? I had left my spare tube at home, so I was helpless.

Sadly, the lady left the ride and had to walk back home. Just as I did in Helsinki last summer when my pedal broke. I really felt sorry for her.

Again we headed onwards and reached the new Flottsunds bridge crossing the Fyrisån. There we crossed the bridge and turned back towards Uppsala, along the winding roads, passing small cottages and pastures with cows and horses. It was a nature experience in every way. What a nice route!


Across the bridge and on the road heading to the picnic


Idyllic in every way. When riding a bicycle you got time to see things and smell the nature. It is an experience for all senses.


Happy tweedians riding the open road

We reached our destination for the picnic, it was an old house were Carl von Linne once lived from time to time. There were benches and tables in the garden under the trees, where we had our sandwiches and drinks. Some of us had even brought Punsch to drink, after all it was the Punsch route.

There are two ways you can drink Punsch in Sweden. One is with ice, as the used to drink in high society back in the 1850’s. The other way is to drink it slightly hot, along with pea soup. But then there is the rule of only eating pea soup on Thursday. Why? Nobody knows, but that is how it is supposed to be. It is as sure as the sun sets at night.

So, since the event was held on a Sunday, there were no pea soup for me. Also, riding for a few hours without any cooling bag for the ice I had to drink the punsch straight. Truly a horrible and strange experience. But when in Rome… as they say.

At the picnic we also had the pleasure of meeting Mr Daniels who showed us his really unique bicycle, that he had found in a shed at his parental house. The bicycle was a British made Hillman Herbert Cooper from 1892. The bicycle was believed to be one of the first bicycles in the village where they lived. Amazingly, the bicycle still works today! Now, how about that for quality?


Some of our bicycles parked along the picnic area


German beer in a English mug with Swedish punsch in a glass from Finland. International!


Our guide held a speech about the history, how Carl von Linne was living at the location


Mr Daniels and his 1892 Hillman Herbert Cooper


The garden where we had the picnic, a small oasis far from everyday life.


Lovely dressed lady, no need to wear tweed for a tweed event. On in this case, vintage event.

After the picnic we started on the last leg of the route, following the bicycle paths leading back towards Uppsala city centre and the starting point at Fyristorg.

After arriving at Fyristorg and thanking the organizer for a great day, a small group of us were heading back to the train station. We decided to have a small drink and something to eat before entering the train and heading home again.


Gathering at the finish line


Crescent 1937, I believe it was. Quite a difference in condition comparing with mine 1934 Crescent


Heading towards the train station after a great day

The Uppsala Vintage Biking event “Punschrundan 2020”, was really a relaxed and pleasant event. It was fun to meet familiar and new tweedians while riding along the surroundings of Uppsala. A big thank you to the organizer for his impressive knowledge about the local area and all the guiding he made.

Until next time. Ride carefully and be safe.

Crescent Tourist Racer 1934

It all started with a fellow tweedian that was searching for some parts he needed to complete his Crescent Tourist Racer project from the mid 1930’s.

The Tourist Racer style was a middle range of bicycles offered by the manufacturers. They were sportier than the standard bicycle. But they still had some basic equipment like mudguards, luggage rack, and so on. While the sport/track racers lacked those parts due to weight. In a way, the Tourist Racers were an everyday sport bicycle.

Back in the 1930’s, almost every large bicycle manufacturer had an tourist racer model in there range. They were dropped out of the range in the late 1940’s, when the standard bicycles became more light weight in general.

At an local flea market, my fellow tweedian found a rusty, dirty and worn old Crescent, just like the one he had. He bought the bicycle and brought it back home. After dismantling the bicycle and removing the parts he needed., the rest of the parts ended up in his attic. It was about that moment I heard about the bicycle. I too, was looking for some parts that were missing, the bicycle in the attic could have the parts I was missing.


An advertisement for Crescent Tourist Racer, available with chromed or stainless steel parts. Today the stainless steel version would cost about £500.

He sent me some photos of the remains of the old bicycle. It did not look so well, all dismantled, rusty and rather sad. But it had the parts I needed. After some discussions back and fourth for a year, I decided take over the project.

There I was, thinking I was done trying to fix old bicycles. I had earlier, very clearly, said no more bicycle projects, with missing parts and a long list of impossible issues to fix! But still, there it was in my hallway, as mentioned earlier, rusty, dirty and worn. But it still had a lot of charm.


One of the photos I got of the project


There is a bicycle among those parts


Dry fitting all the parts, I also added my old Versol derailleur to see if it fitted the frame

After dry-fitting all parts and adding some that I had laying around. It turned out to be a great looking bicycle with lots of attitude and potential. Now it was only a matter of examinate how much the rust had eaten up the frame, fenders and other various parts. The easiest way to clean the bicycle was by going to the local petrol station, and there I would do something that is not so healthy for an vintage bicycle in any circumstance. Just simply use the power wash to clean the bicycle from centuries of old grease, dirt and grime.

I had a set of vintage bicycle wheels, complete with tubes and tires. They came in handy when I rolled the frame to the gas station. There I started to wash the entire bicycle. Not a gentle cleaning with mild soap and an cotton cloth. No, it was full blast with chemicals and water pressure! Grease, grime and water sprayed and flew all over the place, on the walls, on to me, down in to my shoes. Suddenly, a faint green colour emerged underneath all the dirt on the frame. The paint was not lost, that was really good news.

When I got back at home, I did one more thing you should not to a vintage bicycle, or at all for that matter. I placed an cleaning paste direct on the mudguard, then I took some steel wool, dipped it in a strong degreaser agent and started to rub a portion of the mudguard with the solution, just to see how it turned out.

When wiping off the brown gunk that had formed, a deep green colour emerged. Not only the was green colour visible. More and more of the black pin-striping details along with the golden pin-striping decorations became visible. When scrubbing and wiping more and more, I found some painted emblems on the frame and mudguards. It was amazing, almost like archaeology, but in a smaller scale! I went to the local supermarket to buy more steel wool and more cleaning agents. Now it was time for the frame!


The spot where I first tried scrubbing. The image does not show the clear difference

After a while scrubbing and wiping, the frame and mudguards was fairly clean from surface rust. To prevent more rust I spread a thin coating of oil on the frame and on all parts. The rust will always be there, but if stored dry and warm and with a thin coat of oil, the rusting process will slow down. As they did back then.

I decided to dismantle the entire bicycle now when it was clean-ish. All bearings would be cleaned and degreased, they surely would need that after all those years and the abuse with the power wash. The front fork was easy to dismantle, clean up and reassemble with new grease. I removed the dust cap on the crank-set to dismantle it, but it felt really good when I tried to move it, no play at all or grinding in the bearings. It actually turned as smooth as the day it left the factory. In fact, I have never seen such good and free movement in a crank-set, especially not at an bicycle that is a bit more than 80 years old. The dust cap and locking ring went right back on. It was time to assembly the bicycle.


I had an old Crescent lady mascot that was missing a wing. It fitted on the mudguard there the original lady was. Now she sits there, watching the road again.

First I took my well worn vintage Brooks race saddle with an old vintage seat post. It was meant to be for a different project, but it was never used. It was the same story with the pedals, the handlebar stem and the original Crescent bicycle bell. Now they all finally came to use. In a shop I found a pair of vintage handlebar grips in a green shade, they looked to fit the green colour on the frame perfectly. The condition of all the parts fits the bicycle just perfect, all worn, original 1930’s.

I remembered the old dented and rusty ASEA headlight, the one with cracked glass along with the really worn ASEA dynamo, that I used on the £20 bicycle earlier. When scrapping the old bicycle (the frame was crooked most likely after a collision and was a pain to ride), another fellow tweedian was given the ASEA set to one of his projects. He never finished his project, and after some persuasion I got the headlight and dynamo back. Rusty headlight with cracked glass and tainted reflector, the look was perfect on the my project. Again, all worn, original 1930’s.


The ASEA headlight, green grips and Crescent bicycle bell


Quick release nuts


Lovely pin-striping and a bit of the original colour was visible when I removed the rusty pump holders


The Crescent lady looking up into the sky while resting on a crescent moon.

The wheels that came with the frame on the other hand was a sad story. They were so badly rusted, that there were large parts missing from the rim, there were holes, other than the holes for the spokes that made me question the safety or functionality of the original wheels. I decided to keep the hubs for spare parts, and recycle the rims and spokes. The wheel set I used when washing the frame came in handy. After cleaning the frame, the wheels actually had the same worn look.

I took the hubs apart and cleaned them up before greasing and oiling them again. The original rear hub had a double rear chain wheel. It was a simple way to shift gear back then. Simply loosen the wheel with the quick release nuts, give the chain some slack, lift over the chain to the desired gear and stretch the chain and tighten the nuts. Luckily the shop where I found the grips also had a two geared rear chain wheel, so now it was almost as original again.


Two geared rear chain wheel

Finally, the Crescent Tourist Racer was ready. How it rides? Like a dream. It rides like the wind. I do not like riding racers or use drop handlebars. But this bicycle is something special, it is almost like it was not ready for the scrap heap in some way. It has many miles left in the frame and seems to be happy and wants to ride fast again.


The complete bicycle


Lovely lines

When I took it for a test ride, I found a long straight with a bicycle lane. There was a lady riding her modern plastic bicycle far in front of me. “Tally-ho, here we go”, I started to pedal faster and faster, really pushing down the pedals with force while bending down and holding the handlebars in the grips. Like a green flash I passed the lady with my tweed jacket flapping in the wind. It must have been a sight for the lady, a strange tweed dressed fellow passing her while riding an rusty old bicycle. Dangerous!

When I later slowed down, I realized that it was the first time in 30 years I had made an dash like that. Riding Tourist Racer bicycles transform every day riders to pure giro cyclists.

Solo Tweed Ride, 2020

After attending different tweed rides in Sweden, Norway, Finland, United Kingdom, Denmark and Iceland. I thought it would be interesting to attend a tweed event in a new country. In my research I found that many towns in Germany have their own tweed rides. For example Stuttgart, Hildesheim and Oldenburg just to name a few. Attending a tweed ride in Germany would be a fun and new experience for me. Besides, it is not far from Sweden either so travelling there would be easy.

While browsing the internet one day, I found an page on Facebook. Tweed Ride Berlin in Germany, a tweed event with focus on clothes in a 1900 to 1950´s style, with a vintage picnic at the end. The date of the event was set to Sunday the 26th of April. To me that sounded really interesting!

It is possible to check in with the bicycle on a plane and fly to Berlin for a weekend. The thought of riding my bicycle on the streets of Berlin, along with other tweed riders and have a picnic in a park sounded really great. I signed up to join the Berlin Tweed Ride event right there on the spot. Berlin here we come!


The bags are packed, it is time to hit the road.

Then that nasty virus struck the world. Pandemic, many countries locking down and applying quarantines on cities with restrictions on gatherings of people. With the virus, everyday life took a turn for the worst for many, peoples life changed in all possible ways. In times like these, a bicycle tweed event is of insignificant importance. Health and well-being is more important.

The organizers of Tweed Ride Berlin understandably cancelled the event due to the current situation and regulations. For many of us tweed riders, a tweed event is something that we all are looking forward to. It is something to plan outfits for, servicing the old bicycles so they will work without breaking down. When the day of the tweed event arrives, we pack our picnic baskets and meet other tweedians for a great day with lots of fun. But I am sure, that we all understand and respects that events are being cancelled, as the Berlin event was.


Vintage bicycle and tweed

But some days after the organizers of Berlin Tweed Ride had cancelled their event, there was a new post on their page with an interesting message:
” Let’s do a ride together! Individually! On Sunday 26 April 2020 would have been our popular Berlin Tweed Ride. Due to Corona it can’t take place in it’s classic form. Our idea is to ride anyway! Solo or with one partner. Let’s share the experience and post your pictures marded with the hashtag #SoloTweedRide”.

Now that is truly a wonderful idea! Making sure that there is a tweed event, while adjusting to current situation. Still having an event, but remake it an individual event. So all could still make the ride, but on their own terms, simply post an photo or two later on social media to show that we still dressed up and had a great day. Not together in real life, but as a community. For me it meant that I did not have to travel to Berlin, but could make the day from home. A fun and safe event.

I lift my hat for the Berlin Tweed Ride organizers for this initiative.


An fairly new Skeppshult bicycle along a rather old Crescent.


A beautiful spring morning along the roads of Forrest cemetery in south of Stockholm


Picnic, traditional sandwiches, tea and beer.


Two riders

We were two riders from Enskede in Stockholm that attended the event, the condition of the #solotweedride was one or two riders. Far from Berlin, riding our bicycles and having a vintage picnic, at the same time as other did the same in Germany, and other parts of the world did the same. I did some traditional sandwiches for my self, they were tasty. But not as good as an currywurst in Berlin. Next time perhaps?

An virtual retro-event that everyone can attend at their own terms. I must say that it was a wonderful idea, simple and fun. Let us do this again!

Stay safe and take care.

Winter Tweed Run Helsinki 2020

Last year when I attended Winter Tweed Run Helsinki 2019,  I made two bad decisions. The first mistake was to think that it would be easier to carry the bicycle in a bag onboard the cruise ship from Sweden to Finland. The second mistake was that I did not plan to stay for the party.

That is why I decided to ride my bicycle onboard the cruise ship this time. Also to stay at an hotel in Helsinki so I could attend the Winter Tweed Run Helsinki 2020 party and not feel any pressure to leave the event early.


Instead of carrying the bicycle, why not just ride the bicycle onboard?

When arriving in Helsinki on the morning of the event it was a perfect bicycle weather, a tiny bit snow in the air mixed with sunshine and around 0 degrees Celsius. Well, it was not perfect weather for the event. After all it is Winter Tweed Run. It could have been way colder, about -15 degrees and 50 centimetre of snow would have been nice. Extreme sport in tweed!

I went to the start at Senaatintori in the centre of Helsinki. The event started 1300, even if I was a bit early, there were other tweed riders already there. It was really nice to meet many familiar faces and have fun discussions about everything and nothing. After a few minutes the organisers joined us, as they walked around and greeted everyone welcome, they handed out a sticker as a souvenir to each rider. In the end we turned out to be about 50 tweed riders that joined up on the square for Winter Tweed Run Helsinki’s tenth year anniversary .


Arriving tweed participants


Bicycles and tweed


All sorts of bicycles in among the riders

After a while it was announced that it was time for the group photo. We climbed the stairs to Helsinki Cathedral with our bicycles and got in position. While standing on the stairs I noticed a photographer I recognised taking photos of us. I dashed down the stairs and asked if he could use my camera to take some photos of the group. He was happy to help out, sadly I never got his name. If he reads this, thank you very much for the help and all the great photos.


About 50 riders joined on Senaatintori

After having our photos taken and shouting the ceremonial thee cheers (in Finnish), we got some news about the ride. We would take the same route as last time. But not stopping by at Cafe Regatta this year. Instead we would have our break at cafe and museum Villa Hagasund, located in the heart of Helsinki. That would mark the end of the first part of the event. Later on the ride would continue to a new place where there would be tea and dance in the evening.

Also, it was important when riding our bicycles to keep the distance between the riders close. If we were crossing streets and the traffic lights would turn red. We should keep going. Since we are an parade, or unit, we have the law on our side, also a tight formation is a good thing if anything happens. Things like a bicycle breaking down or someone having an accident.


Time to line up for the start


Checking bicycles

We formed a line on the square and the familiar honking from the old ball horn gave us the signal that we were on our way. Along the streets where both tourists and local Helsinki residents were looking baffled and amazed by the odd sight of us riding our vintage bicycles while dressed in tweed. Winter Tweed Run Helsinki 2020 had officially started.

Sadly just after the start one of the two tandem crews that had a flat tire. One of the organisers had a cargo bicycle with tools and spare parts with him. But I think that the tandem bicycle had a special dimension of the tires so they had to visit a bicycle shop for some emergency service. They later joined us further down the route.

The ride went along the seafront towards Kompassitori in south of Helsinki. The sun was shining when we stopped for a small break where we waited for, as I understood it, another bicycle that had a flat tire earlier. After having a chat with the other riders for a short while, it was time to get on our way again.


On our way…


…along the seaside


At Kompassitori


Two girls on their tandem bicycle at the shore of Lapinlahti

We were riding along the streets and bicycle paths of Helsinki, dodging trams and pedestrians before arriving at Villa Hagasund. There they had set up a drink station with hot juice and cider along with gingerbread. It was a really nice treat for us, something sweet and tasty after the ride. The organiser stepped up on some stairs and thanked us for visiting their event. After the speech there was gentleman dressed in tweed with impressive handlebar moustache that held a long speech. Sadly I had no idea what he was saying. But we listened to him and cheered again at the end of his speech.


Speeches and cheers at Villa Hagasund


Lovely dress


The service bicycle


It was a really nice day in Helsinki

After the break, some riders said goodbye and went home. While the remaining riders started the last stretch of the ride towards the tea and dance party later that evening. We went down to the main railway station in centre of Helsinki and headed east, towards where the old Arabia porcelain factory once were located and our final destination, Kaffila Bokvillan.

At the finish line we parked our bicycles and went in for the party. Of course there was the traditional pea soup with bread and a drink waiting for us. I really like pea soup, but this soup is something special. Amazing!

After the dinner a dance teacher learned us swing dance, a skill that was needed later when the magnificent Maestro Ruscello and his group Gruppo Velocitá, entertained us with their lovely music. Now, it was time to relax and enjoy the tea and dance party until very late in the evening.


The finish line at Kaffila Bokvillan


Promotion for the event and the sticker we got as a souvenir


Maestro Ruscello e Gruppo Velocitá


Tea and dance party kept on the whole night!

Every participant I talked with, said the same thing. Winter Tweed Run Helsinki 2020, the tenth year anniversary was a warm, fun and happy event. It was a wonderful event in every way!

I even dare to say, if everything goes well, we’ll meet next year again… and I will ride my bicycle onboard the cruise ship, never carrying it again.

Lady blue

I just realized that I have never presented the bicycle I call Lady blue. Perhaps now is a good time as any.

Some years ago I was asked about an old bicycle, it was standing unused in a basement for many years. The owners said that they wound never ride a bicycle again, so it was time to pass it on. Since they knew that I was looking for a vintage bicycle, they thought that it best to ask me. I was told that the bicycle was given to the present owners from a friend of theirs. The original owner, a elderly lady from south of Sweden, had received the bicycle as a birthday gift when she was 8 years old back in mid 1930’s.


Hella, made in Kalmar in about 1935 as I got it

It was a nice story behind the bicycle, I headed home and started to think how I would restore it in the best way. Restore it to how it once looked, adding accessories from the period. The bicycle it self had a headbadge with the name “Hella” and the text “made in Kalmar” written on it. The rear wheel Torpedo hub was stamped with 31, so it was made around those years. That was completely in line with the story about the young girl receiving the bicycle as a present around 1935.

Since it was my first vintage bicycle restoring after I had sold my old grey Panther, I felt like doing a good job, or at least as good as I could. All with the knowledge, tools and parts I had in my possession to renovate and restore the bicycle. The first thing I did was to completely disassembly the entire bicycle in to small parts. All bearings, screws, and parts were inspected and cleaned. Some parts were in very good condition, but others like the handlebars and wooden grips were in a really bad shape and needed replacement.


New tires and tubes to be mounted on the newly cleaned rims


The frame is clean from parts, I have just mounted brackets and wheels to see how it looks

It was during the cleaning I found the serial number on the frame. Of the number I learned that the frame was made in the town of Gävle, far from Kalmar.

Back then Gefle Velocipedfabrik manufactured bicycle frames and sold them to local bicycle shops that created their own style of bicycles from parts and named them after their own shop. There are may examples of that practice around Sweden in from the start up to about the 1950’s. There are numerous small branded bicycles, many are built with parts from one of the few large bicycle parts manufactures at the time. But they have all sorts of brands, often the name comes from the shop owners own name, a Greek god, perhaps a town and so on.


Torpedo stamped with 31, the hub is made in 1931.

I found new old handlebars on an auction site, there I found an old bicycle bell, chain guard and other parts that I needed. After cleaning all parts, polishing the chrome, the fun of mounting everything together started. This time I took my time to get the bicycle done. I did not want to rush the process, it was my therapy and I wanted to show the old lady the result.

During the restoration I tried to keep the parts I got as replacements in a 1930s range. The vintage crochet skirt guard, 30’s style Swedish made ASEA headlight and dynamo. The saddle turned out to be a bit difficult, vintage 1930’s cushioned saddles are rare to find after all usage during the years. Instead I used an old vintage Brooks saddle as a substitute.

One day it was finished, and it looked really great. In fact I used it as a prop when doing a photo shoot.


1930’s ASEA bicycle lamp…


… withan ASEA brass dynamo.

A few years later, I took a look at my first rebuilding project. I quickly realized that I never completed the job, the wheels were missing spokes, the saddle were still the worn Brooks and the tires were a bit to wide to fit the mudguards. It was at that moment after learning new information about old bicycles that the bicycle was remade in the early 1950’s.

Since the bicycle was made in mid 1930’s it was supposed to be painted with a special kind of finish and pin striping. As it looks now it is clearly an late 1940’s, early 1950’s style. The chain wheel is changed, the reflector and other parts where changed. Back then it was common to take your old bicycle to your local bicycle shop, turn it in for a complete overhaul. The shop would change the bad parts, repaint and refurbish the entire bicycle. It was cheaper, you got a new bicycle for less money of the price for a brand new one. Back then bicycles were expensive and when you had a bicycle it was supposed to be taken care of, and used for a long time. It was an investment.


The chain guard and chromed crank. Clearly changed at some time during the years


Brook saddle and some vintage tools and a repair kit


It turned out really great, I only need a better saddle

It is not original 1931, but it looks really great. The circle became complete when I sent a photo of the bicycle to the owners I got the bicycle from, they showed the photo of the bicycle to the old lady. She was very happy to see that her old bicycle still were going and having a new life. Sadly the old lady passed away some months after that. But I did manage to fix her old bicycle so she could see it, it felt great.

If I fix the small issues, Lady blue has many years left of riding along the roads on sunny summer days. Or why not attend a tweed event?


Lady blue