Enskede Tweed, (Vårrullen 2020)

Care for a spring roll? Not the eating kind am I afraid, although they are tasty and nice. But what I am referring to, is the 4th Enskede Tweed society event, called the Spring roll, “vårrullen” in Swedish.

The explanation is rather simple. The name came up during the dinner party at the Enskede Tweed society event Höstrusket last autumn. “Let us call it the spring roll”, one of the participants said. After all, it makes total sense! We will roll on our bicycles in the spring, the spring roll. Brilliant! It was decided right there and then.


Last minute preparation, the rear hub needed desperate attention.

9th of May 2020 was set for the 4th Enskede Tweed society event. Our events are just for fun, a good opportunity to meet others tweedians, dress up in nice clothes and use our old bicycles for a slow and calm ride around the parts of Stockholm where we live. It is a tweed event, right in our back yard.

Also, riding bicycles are good, both for the environment and yourself. After all, with all the current virus tragedy going on with isolation and quarantines. It is only good to get out and about, to have a bit of fresh air ventilate the old tweed. Spiffing good show, I say!


On the way to Stockholmsvägen and the meeting point

The weather forecast for the day mentioned heavy overcast and about 10 degrees Celsius. In other words, perfect weather for a ride in tweed. The bicycles were serviced, picnic hampers and bags were packed, tweeds were brushed. We were ready!

The event should started at 1300, but due to some mishaps, the entire staff of Enskede Tweed Society was delayed for a bit.

The issue of an exploding rear tire, made for some last minute changes in the bicycle department. An stand in bicycle was quickly made ready for duty, a simple matter of making sure the tires had good pressure, adjust the seats and off we went. Arriving only 10 minutes late to the meeting at the start. Rather hot after a brisk ride, the staff arrived at Stockholmsvägen, the usual meeting point for members in Enskede Tweed Society.


Fellow tweedians joining up


Well packed picnicks hampers and blankets to sit on during the picnic


Having a chat while enjoying tea and cake in the sunshine

The chairman of Enskede Tweed society offered hot tea and home made cake, just as the last event. It really got a British touch to it with tea and cake. Perhaps next time, we should tell everyone to bring along real cups and saucers for an afternoon tea instead of an picnic?


Ladies and gentlemen, get ready to start the ride

After finishing the tea and cake, and after talking about other things, of shoes and ships and sealing wax. Of cabbages and kings. It was time to start the ride. We started our route by taking the back streets along the old parts of Enskede. Watching all the gardens with their spring flowers in blossom and all the bright green leaves on bushes and trees. The weather forecast was wrong, it was not overcast. In fact, it was sunny and warm, a perfect spring day.


Riding along the cycle paths


A short break before entering the Forrest cemetery


Photo opportunity


Along the roads at Forrest cemetery

We took the route in to Skogskyrkogården (Forrest cemetery) as usual. The calm and tranquillity you experience there are really soothing for everyone. There are no cars racing around, blasting their horns. Just to ride along and enjoy the smell of forest while listening to birds singing is very peaceful.

Shortly after we exited the Forrest cemetery we stopped by the Olympia park in Tallkrogen and set up our picnic on the large meadow. We parked our bicycles and put out blankets on the grass and unpacked our picnic hampers. Sandwiches, cakes, tea, beer and gin and tonic. Music and laughs all around, we had a really great time.


Our bicycles needed a rest…


…as did we


Lovely weather at Olympia park

After about 1.5 hours it was time for us to head on again. The last stretch of the route took us along the streets of 1930-50s houses and areas. Along the route there were people waving and smiling at us. It seems that tweed and bicycles brings out happiness in both riders and bystanders. It is a rather harmless and fun thing to do, ride along on a vintage bicycles while being well dressed, not necessarily in tweed.


Group photo at the usual site

After the group photo, we headed on our way to the finish line at Enskede Gård. Sadly, we never took a photo at the mansions stairs like we use to. There was a man standing right above the stairs fixing his car. It would have been a strange photo, a modern car all torn down in pieces in the photo, while we were standing there with our bicycles. A slight clash of styles one might say.


At the finish line, when will next event take place?

The organizers thanked everyone that had joined the Spring roll, the first official unofficial Enskede Tweed society event of this year. Some riders left the group, the rest of us headed down to Enskede värdshus for a cool refreshing drink. The weather was so nice, that we ended up in the garden of the inn to relax before it was time for us to leave.

Next event is planed to take place in October. What the name will be for that event? Who knows, but I guess it will be something autumn related, in some way.

Until next time.


Riding back home in the sunset

Enskede Tweed, (Höstrusket 2019)

Saturday 26th of October. It was time for the third Enskede Tweed event, Höstrusket 2019.

The information about the event mentioned that the ride would be held despite weather, sun, rain or even snow. The Höstrusket event was happening. After all, tweed, is a fabric made for rugged weather. Tweed jacket, woollen scarf, wellingtons and knitted socks will keep you warm and dry all day long. Unless it is way to cold, but then it is only a matter of adding layers.

The rain poured down on the morning of the event, but the weather services indicated that the rain would stop around noon. Amazingly the rain stopped as predicted, but the grey skies were still threatening to deliver more rain during the day while we headed off to the start.

As the last time, the start was located at Triangelparken in Enskede. New for this time was that hot tea and freshly baked cake awaited the brave riders. The hot and tasty tea along with the cake made it feel a bit British among all the yellow leaves on the ground.

After finishing our tea and home baked cakes the organizers explained the route and encouraged the riders to remember the traffic rules. After all, we were going to ride along the streets together with others. Shortly thereafter, it was time to get the ride started.


The organizers offered tea and cake to the participants at the start at Triangelparken


Vintage bicycles from different makers and years, from 1930’s to 1960’s.

Following the back roads around Gamla Enskede (the old part of Enskede from 1910’s), we headed our way towards the “The Woodland Cemetery” with short stops along the way for some guidance and history about the areas. At the cemetery we stopped and visited the actress Greta Garbo’s grave before heading along the route.

It was a peaceful route on the cemetery, seeing places you normally do not visit. The Woodland Cemetery is a very large and beautiful place in Stockholm, it was a nice ride there. When exiting the cemetery we headed down to some of the oldest houses in Enskede, built around 1790. It was nice to see those old hoses, a memory from the time before 1930’s, when Stockholm city council decided to buy old farm mansions land to build complete new areas for the ever expanding population in Stockholm.


A quick break before entering the Woodland Cemetery


Parked bicycles at the location of actress Greta Garbo’s grave


On our way again

Enskede is an area built in different stages during the years. The first stage of development was back in 17th century, old mansions with huge land areas with large farms managed by smaller cottages and mansions located here and there. But in the early 1900, the large expansion started. Stockholm grew and needed new areas to build hoses and living areas. 1909 was when the “garden town” of Enskede was founded, a modern part of the city. Houses with gardens to grow flowers and vegetables.

Later on in the 1930’s large areas was built with cheep and simple wooden hoses that offered the working class their own homes. In fact the agency controlled by the city was called “Own homes agency”. That boom of houses had a second wave in the 50´s. While we were riding along with the Enskede tweed event, we saw all the different areas and the different architectures of the eras was clearly noticeable.

Our ride continued to the “own homes” areas of Tallkrongen and Svedmyra, areas that got their names from old farm houses that once was located on large mansions properties. As mentioned in an earlier article, Höstrusket 2018

We later headed down to Enskede fältet and the finish location at Enskede mansion as always. There it was time for the traditional group photo before the organizers thanked everyone and said that there will be a ride next year to.


The group photo at Enskede gård


Riding a bicycle with style

After chatting for a while and taking photos of bicycles and the riders, few of the riders decided to leave after a great day. The rest of us went to Enskede Värdshus for supper and drinks. After all, the ride in light drizzle and fairly rugged weather, we all looked forward to have some hot food.

The evening continued with many laughs and odd stories. It was a great eventing in every way. One of the topic were that the Höstrusket event is really nice, just because then there is a reason to get out and attend a tweed event one last time before the winter. After all, why sitting at home watching TV. When you can ride a bicycle, dressed in tweed instead?

Or as they say, “there is no bad weather, only bad clothes”. With tweed, there is no excuses. Or very few ones at least.

Until next time, ride safely.

 

Bike in Tweed Stockholm, 2019

Saturday the 21´st of September, it was time for a new tweed event to participate in. Early in the morning, I packed the old bicycle bags with my lunch package. Sandwiches with cheese, boiled potatoes, pickled herrings and tomatoes. A simple version of the classic SOS “smör, ost och sill” (butter, cheese and herring, it is an small smörgåsbord for one person). I also packed some bottles of beer, water, gin, tonic, a small bottle of Jaloviina and a bottle of Champis (a carbonated soda that has been available in shops since 1918, that goes well with Jaloviina). After all it is important to stay hydrated.


All packed and ready to join Bike in Tweed 2019

The weather was perfect, the sun was shining, it was not to hot or cold. A crisp autumn morning, fresh air and blue skies. I started my journey towards the city and Evert Taubes terrass in the centre of Stockholm, the start location for the event. That has been the same start location as the last two years, a great place with a nice view of the city. While I was peddling along the empty streets, the only sounds that could be heard, was the old Nordstjärnans tires running along the tarmac and the fluttering of the small pennant, an vintage Swedish flag pennant that I had tied to the handlebars as they did back then. It was really a lovely morning ride.

When getting closer to the start, I noticed several other tweed riders heading the same way. A tip of the hat, a wave and a smile – good morning, what a lovely weather today!

At the start, the organizers had already started welcoming the riders. This year the start area was really well planned. Upon arrival we were guided via an red and white tape to the registration desk. There checklists where checked, starting number were handed out along with food tickets for those who had signed up and paid for the the after-ride dinner.  Later on I learned that there was cookies and crisps handed out to the participants along the registrations line. Sadly I did not get any, I must have arrived in a gap.


Standing in line for registration


Interview, some story behind the bicycle and cloths.


Lovely weather, a great autumn day

After registration, we followed the tape to be interviewed about our bicycles and our selection of clothes. All judged in front of the jury. That was a new and fun segment, I mentioned that my bicycle was made in Stockholm and the pennant was the Swedish flag and had the text Stockholm and an image of the city hall printed on it. I got praise for the way I had mounted the pennant, correctly mounted with an wire going from the bicycle bell on the handlebar down to the nut on the front wheel, as it should be.

After the interview we followed the tape to the photo session. It is tradition at Bike in Tweed to have a photo taken of you and your bicycle. This year they used two photographers, it was a fast and well organized process. There are so many other great looking people with wonderful bicycles, a quick pose with your bicycle and follow the instructions from the photographer, “click”. It is an great memory to keep.


More tweedians arrived and parked at the square after being photographed

After the photo session we were guided along the tape to the main square where we could park our bicycles and begin to mingle and talk with new and old familiar faces. It was nice to meet all tweedians again, it was a year since the last time we met.

Walking around in the sunshine watching all those vintage, new, rat-rods, beaters, everyday riders, penny farthings and regular bicycles of all kinds. Not forgetting all beautiful dresses, handsome suits, vintage military uniforms and everyone that had dressed up. All those hats, beards and accessories really made it a great gathering of tweedians on a beautiful day.


1930´s style nurse with a lovely smile

It was time to start the ride. The route was heading north towards the busy Tegelbacken and then passing the city hall, I guess my bicycle and pennant was feeling at home at that moment. We rode along the seafront of Norr Mälarstrand heading to the picnic at Rålambshov park. This year it was decided to have a shorter route, also have the picnic 30 minutes after the start.


Gathering for the start…


…and away we go


Crossing the bridge from Riddarholmen to Tegelbacken


Heading down to Norr Mälarstrand on our way to Rålambshov

The ride was in a nice tempo and everything went just fine until we arrived at Rålambshov and the amphitheatre, were we used to have our picnic. The entire place was occupied by an athlete event! They had blocked the stairs where we use to sit so the runners could run up and down. Large stations where people was standing and shouting pep talks to the runners.

It was some sort of endurance competition for runners, modern music was blasting out all over the park. Our organizer talked to the people in charge, after all we had permit from the police to be there. I do not know what happened, but they stopped the music. It all was confused and improvised. Our traditional group photo was taken against an small slope of grass. After that we were supposed to have a picnic, somewhere.


Time for the group photo where the athletes event had blocked the stairs in the background


But there was a group photo taken finally, sadly I have no copy of it yet

The resourceful Lucie took command over a few tweedians and said that we were going to sit on the seats of the theatre as usual anyway. We headed over the marked tracks, dodging the runners, and headed up on the stairs. It was fun to sit there, watching the runners going up and down the stairs. While we were having a picnic. I was drinking beer, gin and tonic and having pickled herring, potatoes, sandwiches with cheese and dessert. Sometimes we shouted “come one, keep the steps light, looking good, that’s the spirit”. The runners did not look happy.

To be honest, I prefer riding an old bicycle with one gear, dressed in tweed, than running up and down stairs looking totally worn out. An gentleman does not run or exercise.


We all spread out for the picnic while athletes was running all over the place


Pickled herring, potatoes, tomatoes and sandwiches with cheese. All served on a enamel plate from 1940´s with cutlery from the same year

After the picnic we headed along the route again. Starting by working our way up and across Västerbron (West bridge). That bridge really sorts out the soft weekends bicyclists from the hardcore bicycle fanatics. Riders that are used to ride vintage bicycles that weighs as an old hospital bed. Besides, a real gentleman do not stand up while peddling, neither does an gentleman dismount the bicycle and walk. Also, gears are simply not cricket, so that is out.

What is left, is to harden out the uphill. With an steady pace, determination and firm grip on the handlebar, the uphill will be defeated! As you understand by now, I am grasping for excuses for my idiotic peddling up the bridge when I easily could have dismounted and walked instead.


An penny farthing heading towards the bridge


Going down hill after crossing Västerbron towards Södermalm


Cargo bicycle with lots of cargo and handsome riders waiting for the car to move


The old cargo train tracks down by the Hammarby canal

After crossing Västerbron we headed down to Södermalm, a part of Stockholm with large appartment buildings from 1910-1940’s. We saw some really nice parts of the city along our route that we usually never visit. The route continued down to the Hammarby canal, then we turned and went uphill again. Finding our way among the back alleys of Södermalm until it was time for the most chaotick part of the route. We were going to cross the total mayham of Slussen.

Slussen is an part of Stockholm city that are undergoing an complete rebuild. The old constructions were made in the 1930´s and is now in desperate need of renovation. Today almost everything is torn down and the area is a construction site today. There are temporary roads going all over the place. Cars, buses, pedestrians, taxis, kids, bicycles, skateboards, tourists and 190 tweedians on bicycles was trying to get along at the same time. It was a challenge.


We are leaving the chaos of Slussen behind us…


… the roads opened up a bit. It was time for some romance while riding bicycles

The ride continued along the sea side of Skeppsbron, the part of the city that has been a port since medieval times. Passing the royal castle, across the bridge to Kungsträdgården and over to Nybroplan while avoiding pedestrians all the way. The route continued along Strandvägen the “posh” street, crossing Djurgårdsbron trying to avoid running over people. The bicycle lane on the bridge is narrow, but it all went well. After that we all headed out on Djurgården. The finish line at Hasselbacken was in reach.

You might think that it was many streets and places I mentioned in the last part. But I mentioned them because those areas are the most tourist crowded places in Stockholm, all year around. There we were, about 190 vintage cyclists among all tourists. It was an sight to see. All cameras was turned away from the royal castle and all the other sights. Only to take photos of us dressed in tweeds, riding old bicycles.


Hendricks gin are on the way to Hasselbacken

Shortly after the ride on Djurgården we all arrived at Hasselbacken restaurant as previous years. Upon our arrival, Erik Tengholm Trio was playing live music for us. We parked our bicycles and gathered in front of the stage to enjoy the music. The sponsor Hendricks gin was handing out gin and tonics to us thirsty riders. It was really nice, listening to live music while sipping on an cold and tasty gin and tonic.

Later on the price ceremony started, the always impressive Vintagemannen presented the winners and handed out the prices for best dressed man, best dressed lady and best looking bicycle. Sadly I did not notice the prices they received. Later on Hendricks handed out their price. The “most unusual award” was handed out. Congratulations to all winners, they were all looking absolutely wonderful!


Erik Tengholm Trio playing jazz


Vintagemannen was in charge of the price ceremony


Hendricks gin handed out an special price, the “most unusual award”


My bicycle with the pennant with Stockholm’s city hall parked at the restaurants garden

After the price ceremony it was time for dinner. As always, it was great to sit and have dinner together with all tweedians. Having conversations about the day and how it all went. More drinks, laughs and conversations.

But as all fun things, everything comes to an end. The sun had set, people were leaving, riding their bicycles into the dark and cold autumn night. Before we started our way home, we decided to attend Bike in Tweed next year to, after all it is Bike in Tweed´s 10th anniversary next year.

Thank you for Bike in Tweed 2019, see you all soon.


The ride home after a great day

The winter project, part 2 (Fram bicycle)

What to do when Christmas season is getting close? Should I clean the flat? Buy a Christmas tree? Or even do the national sport of run around in shops, searching for last minute Christmas gifts while wrestling people?

This year I think I made the perfect choice. I simply went down to the basement for an relaxing session with my winter project. The Uppsala made Fram bicycle I mentioned in an earlier post. It was nice and calm to sit in the basement while listening to vintage music and repairing vintage bicycles, avoiding the ever present hysteria in the city.

Long ago I created a playlist called ‘Smoke rings‘ on the musical streaming service Spotify. That is an playlist with mostly European jazz, swing and dancehall music from 1930’s up to 1950’s. In short, perfect selection of music to get in the mood (see what I did there?) while servicing and repairing and old bicycles.


The Fram made in Uppsala about 1942 is now almost complete.


Brooks B66 saddle, rusty old ASEA headlight with cracked glass, I also found an original mudguard emblem at an auction.

First of all, the Fram bicycle needed a good cleaning after, what I suspect, being in a barn for the most part of the latest 50 years. Spider webs, dust, bird droppings, more dust, occasional insects, old mud, did I mention even more dust, was covering the entire bicycle. Off to the car wash with the entire bicycle. After degreasing, washing, shampooing, rinsing and a coat of wax later the Fram looks rather nice. Still rusty, but cleaner.


Old and used, but can still provide many happy miles of riding.

After returning the bicycle to my basement, I started to look it over, it was in a good original condition. I decided there was no need to dismount and grease all the bearings, they all seemed to be in working order. But of course, the front hub and rear hub with the brake will get an overhaul later in the spring. It is better to be safe than sorry, after all. The possibility to break is an overall good option to have. The cranks felt firm and had no strange sounds or odd feel to them when I turned them over. The same was for the pedals and front fork bearings. All bearings were surprisingly smooth and fine.

The worst rust damages on the entire bicycle was found on the handlebars and stem. The rust was caused by the chrome coating had flaked off many years ago and exposed the metal underneath. I looked in my old box of various parts. I knew that I had an old handlebar there, it is not the original shape. But I prefer the higher angle of handlebars rather than the original low ones. It makes the bicycle ride, a more gentlemanly way of promenade cycling. No laying double folded over the handlebars for racing or the sensation of speed. Sitting straight is the bees-knees.


Well worn 1940’s wooden grip

I had a pair of old wooden grips in a drawer. They were once painted silver. But after years of wear and tear, the paint had cracked. I sanded them down and oiled the wood for a more natural look instead. In the box of parts I also found the ASEA dynamo and the old cracked ASEA head light that I used on the £20 bicycle.

I also found a saddle in that bottomless box, sadly it was a fairly modern Brooks B66 saddle. But it fitted the overall look so I mounted it on the bicycle as well. The same went for the vintage saddle bags in canvas that I never got around to use. Mounted on the luggage rack, they fit the look perfectly as well.


The canvas bags looks like they were made for the bicycle. Not impossible, since the might be the same age.


Perhaps I will add an Stockholm license plate from the 1940’s to complete the look?

The idea I had for the Fram was to mount studded winter tires so I could use the bicycle when it is snowy and icy outside. A short ride in snow is no problem, store the bicycle in a warm place does the trick to prevent rust, or in this case. More rust, since the rims were already slightly rusty.


Fitting a studded winter tire to the front wheel, so far so good.

There is a few more dangers of using old bicycles, or bicycles in general when it is cold. The possibility for moist getting inside the rims and cranks are bigger on the winter when snow gets stuck on the bicycle. When the snow melts the water seeps inside the parts. If it is cold at night the water can freeze and transform to ice. Ice expands, so rims and other parts can crack. Not always, but it can happen. When a bicycle is in a worn condition like the Fram from 1940’s, I feel it unnecessary to chance.


When riding in snow it is important to storage the vintage bicycle in a warm place over night. Not leave it outside. On the photo, 1950’s Crescent left for weeks outside.

I mounted a winter tire on the front wheel and tried if it would fit in the fork, it all seemed to work out. But the rear wheel had some surprises in store for me. First of all, the rear wheel was slightly warped and wobbly. I can live with that. But the issue that made me rethink the decision to use winter tires, was that the wheel sits in an slight angle. Most likely because at some time in its earlier life the rear wheel meet a side walk curb or equal unforgiving edge. The rim is dented on a 5 centimetre long area, so much so that the spoke that holds that part of the rim has been bent and makes the wheel wobble and jump when turning.

Because of that, when I tried the wheel in the frame with the wider winter tire mounted, the tire got stuck against the frame. It did not matter how much I tried to adjust the wheel, sideways, up, down, forward, backwards. It always got stuck against the frame. Sadly I had to abandon the winter cycling plans and mounted narrower standard tires instead. Then it all worked just great.


As an example of an rusty rim: The front wheel of the £20 bicycle that was a complete wreck. The original rim tape that was made in cotton had soaked up water and created rust over the years. The Fram rims just had some surface rust, nothing dangerous but worth to keep an eye at. But the rust will be limited if not riding in the rain or winter so often.

In short, when the snow melts in the spring I will take the Fram bicycle for a test ride. Then I will decided if I will have a professional workshop to have a look at the rear wheel if it is possible to fix it, or not.

Let us hope that it rides as good as it looks.

Enskede Tweed 2018 (höstrusket)

It is strange, that everyone has their vintage tweed and bicycle events in the middle of summer. When the weather is as hot as can be. Well, almost everyone does anyway. Helsinki has their event in the middle of the icy winter instead. Why can there not be an event in the spring or in the autumn when the weather is less, extreme?

That is when Enskede Tweed enters. Last year we had a spring event, but this year we decided to have an event in the autumn instead. The event was quickly named höstrusket. It is a Swedish description of the kind of weather in the autumn with lots of rain, yellow leaves on the trees and puddles on the ground. In short, it is a wool-sweater kind of weather.

The date was set to 14th of October. We all had prepared for the real autumn with rain, woollen sweaters, heavy tweed jackets. Some had even planed to use wellingtons and a macintosh. But what happened? The Indian summer came along and treated us with a sunny and warm day instead. The summer tweed and light shoes had to be taken out from the closet again.


Heading towards the meet up

It is tradition that we all meet at the former Gamla Enskede Bageri (old Enskede bakery), now Robin Delselius Bageri, located in the Garden town of Enskede, as it once was called, at noon. The schedule was planned that we had one hour of gathering before the start at one o’clock. There was plenty of time for lunch or a cup of coffee at the bakery/café.


At the café, waiting for the others to arrive


Rex tandem, with the number plate from Stockholm Bike In Tweed still attached

Some of our members wanted to have a quick lunch at the café, specially becasue they have great vegan alternatives on the menu. But on this day, everything vegan was out. They had some salads, but they contained feta-cheese. That was a disappointment for our members.

To be honest, we are missing the old bakery and café. It was a more genuine and rustic feel to it. robust wooden tables and chairs. A section inside where the bakery was located. You could watch them bake the bread and buns. Now it is more a coffee shop feel to the place. But at least we had some coffee and cinnamon buns while making some last minutes adjustments before the start.

At one o’clock all the participants was ready and we began our route around different parts of Enskede.

We duplicated the route from last year. We passed Enskede church and the old town-houses, that was some of the first ones ever built in Sweden. The entire part of Gamla Enskede (Old Enskede) is designed around 1909-1915, so there are many lovely old villas with nice architectural details to look at.

Our ride continued through Gamla Enskede and headed down to Sockenvägen, the large road that leads up from Old Enskede to the main entrance of Skogskyrkogården (the forest cemetery). But instead of going inside the main entrance, we followed the road ahead. Passing the former tram depot from the 1930’s, it was demolished back in mid 1980’s only to be replaced with those horrible 1980’s style flats.


Yellow leaves

A bit further down the road we stopped at the crossing and took a look at the classic neon sign of “Barnvagnsfabriken” that is located on a building at the crossing. Back in the day it was a pram factory and the old vintage neon sign is still up, considering that the factory closed in the 1990’s. Today it is an Italian restaurant located at the premisses.

We turned right and headed down the road that once was the main road from Stockholm to the countryside before they built the highway in the 1960’s. Today it is a nice calm road with large trees on each side of the road. The road follows the cemetery wall.


The old main road, Tyresövägen


Peacefully riding along

We arrived at a new crossroad where an gasoline station once was located when I was a kid. Today there is modern small flats on that location. We turned right and entered the cemetery and rode along Vårhimmesvägen to the exit on the other side of the cemetery. While riding our bicycles inside the forest cemetery we quietly talked and listened to the wind in the trees and the birds singing. Next year we might take a longer route inside the cemetery, it was really peaceful and quiet.


Vårhimmelsvägen, Skogskyrkogården, (Spring-sky-road, Forest cemetery)


All is still and quiet, a piece of Sweden’s deep forests

After exiting the cemetery we went over the highway on an overpass. There we headed down into Tallkrogen. An area that was built in the early 1930’s by people who wanted to have their own homes. After paying a small fee they got a loan and permission to build a small house, the type of houses were called Egnahem “own home” and was founded by Egnahemsbyrån “own homes agency”. There are some areas like this around Sweden from that era, but they are mainly in Stockholm due to the expansion of population in the 1920’s. The town/city of Stockholm bought huge areas from old mansions. It was old farm land and cottages that was converted into entire new population areas.

They all was in reach of the planned subway system, that started to run in 1950. The name Tallkrogen can be translated to “pine pub” and comes from an old inn that was located there back in the 1700’s. Many of these areas has names from the olden days of mansions and cottages, the heritage lives on in the names.

When exiting Tallkrogen and entering the next area, called Svedmyra. That is also a old cottage name that still lives on. There is an small patch of grass between the houses. We had decided to have a short break there with a picnic, it was a nice break with refreshments and a well deserved rest for some of us that were slightly hungover.


Time for a break


More stickers on the Hermes


The handmade sticker for the event, absolutely wonderful drawing


Enjoying the sun

After the rest we started the last leg of the route. It went from Svedmyra and the 1950’s area with flats and into the area of Stureby. The houses in this area was also built on old farm land. But a few years earlier the other areas. It was built in 1920’s so there is interesting architecture. More of individual designs of the houses. We kept peddling on, passing Strureby and crossing the main road and heading down in to the part that is called Enskedefältet (Enskede field) where they built houses just as in Tallkrongen, but only with a different type of houses.


Heading down to Enskede fältet (Enskede field)

The interesting part with this area is that all streets are named after areas in the Baltic’s that once belonged to Sweden. Finland street, Estonia street and so on. After crossing Enskedefältet we finally arrived at the mansion of Enskede gård. The mansion still stands and are take care of. There we gathered around for a group photo to celibate the end of 2018 Enksede Tweed.


Small, but enthusiastic group of tweed riders


A lovely autumn day

After the event we all went to have a cold beer in the garden of Enskede Värdshus (Enskede inn). It was tasty and it was really great to sit and talk. Sadly the inn closed early. It was after autumn and there are not so many guest at that time of year.


Heading down to Enskede värdshus (Enskede inn)


Time for a drink after the finish

It was a great event, we all were pleased and said it was not the last time Enskede Tweed was held. In fact, when we went on our way later on, we meet some participants from other tweed events. They were out just walking around when we happened to passing by. It turned out that they wanted to join Enskede Tweed next time.

Perhaps it will be a popular event? The main question is, will the next event be a spring or autumn event?