The winter project, part 2 (Fram bicycle)

What to do when Christmas season is getting close? Should I clean the flat? Buy a Christmas tree? Or even do the national sport of run around in shops, searching for last minute Christmas gifts while wrestling people?

This year I think I made the perfect choice. I simply went down to the basement for an relaxing session with my winter project. The Uppsala made Fram bicycle I mentioned in an earlier post. It was nice and calm to sit in the basement while listening to vintage music and repairing vintage bicycles, avoiding the ever present hysteria in the city.

Long ago I created a playlist called ‘Smoke rings‘ on the musical streaming service Spotify. That is an playlist with mostly European jazz, swing and dancehall music from 1930’s up to 1950’s. In short, perfect selection of music to get in the mood (see what I did there?) while servicing and repairing and old bicycles.


The Fram made in Uppsala about 1942 is now almost complete.


Brooks B66 saddle, rusty old ASEA headlight with cracked glass, I also found an original mudguard emblem at an auction.

First of all, the Fram bicycle needed a good cleaning after, what I suspect, being in a barn for the most part of the latest 50 years. Spider webs, dust, bird droppings, more dust, occasional insects, old mud, did I mention even more dust, was covering the entire bicycle. Off to the car wash with the entire bicycle. After degreasing, washing, shampooing, rinsing and a coat of wax later the Fram looks rather nice. Still rusty, but cleaner.


Old and used, but can still provide many happy miles of riding.

After returning the bicycle to my basement, I started to look it over, it was in a good original condition. I decided there was no need to dismount and grease all the bearings, they all seemed to be in working order. But of course, the front hub and rear hub with the brake will get an overhaul later in the spring. It is better to be safe than sorry, after all. The possibility to break is an overall good option to have. The cranks felt firm and had no strange sounds or odd feel to them when I turned them over. The same was for the pedals and front fork bearings. All bearings were surprisingly smooth and fine.

The worst rust damages on the entire bicycle was found on the handlebars and stem. The rust was caused by the chrome coating had flaked off many years ago and exposed the metal underneath. I looked in my old box of various parts. I knew that I had an old handlebar there, it is not the original shape. But I prefer the higher angle of handlebars rather than the original low ones. It makes the bicycle ride, a more gentlemanly way of promenade cycling. No laying double folded over the handlebars for racing or the sensation of speed. Sitting straight is the bees-knees.


Well worn 1940’s wooden grip

I had a pair of old wooden grips in a drawer. They were once painted silver. But after years of wear and tear, the paint had cracked. I sanded them down and oiled the wood for a more natural look instead. In the box of parts I also found the ASEA dynamo and the old cracked ASEA head light that I used on the £20 bicycle.

I also found a saddle in that bottomless box, sadly it was a fairly modern Brooks B66 saddle. But it fitted the overall look so I mounted it on the bicycle as well. The same went for the vintage saddle bags in canvas that I never got around to use. Mounted on the luggage rack, they fit the look perfectly as well.


The canvas bags looks like they were made for the bicycle. Not impossible, since the might be the same age.


Perhaps I will add an Stockholm license plate from the 1940’s to complete the look?

The idea I had for the Fram was to mount studded winter tires so I could use the bicycle when it is snowy and icy outside. A short ride in snow is no problem, store the bicycle in a warm place does the trick to prevent rust, or in this case. More rust, since the rims were already slightly rusty.


Fitting a studded winter tire to the front wheel, so far so good.

There is a few more dangers of using old bicycles, or bicycles in general when it is cold. The possibility for moist getting inside the rims and cranks are bigger on the winter when snow gets stuck on the bicycle. When the snow melts the water seeps inside the parts. If it is cold at night the water can freeze and transform to ice. Ice expands, so rims and other parts can crack. Not always, but it can happen. When a bicycle is in a worn condition like the Fram from 1940’s, I feel it unnecessary to chance.


When riding in snow it is important to storage the vintage bicycle in a warm place over night. Not leave it outside. On the photo, 1950’s Crescent left for weeks outside.

I mounted a winter tire on the front wheel and tried if it would fit in the fork, it all seemed to work out. But the rear wheel had some surprises in store for me. First of all, the rear wheel was slightly warped and wobbly. I can live with that. But the issue that made me rethink the decision to use winter tires, was that the wheel sits in an slight angle. Most likely because at some time in its earlier life the rear wheel meet a side walk curb or equal unforgiving edge. The rim is dented on a 5 centimetre long area, so much so that the spoke that holds that part of the rim has been bent and makes the wheel wobble and jump when turning.

Because of that, when I tried the wheel in the frame with the wider winter tire mounted, the tire got stuck against the frame. It did not matter how much I tried to adjust the wheel, sideways, up, down, forward, backwards. It always got stuck against the frame. Sadly I had to abandon the winter cycling plans and mounted narrower standard tires instead. Then it all worked just great.


As an example of an rusty rim: The front wheel of the £20 bicycle that was a complete wreck. The original rim tape that was made in cotton had soaked up water and created rust over the years. The Fram rims just had some surface rust, nothing dangerous but worth to keep an eye at. But the rust will be limited if not riding in the rain or winter so often.

In short, when the snow melts in the spring I will take the Fram bicycle for a test ride. Then I will decided if I will have a professional workshop to have a look at the rear wheel if it is possible to fix it, or not.

Let us hope that it rides as good as it looks.

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Enskede Tweed 2018 (höstrusket)

It is strange, that everyone has their vintage tweed and bicycle events in the middle of summer. When the weather is as hot as can be. Well, almost everyone does anyway. Helsinki has their event in the middle of the icy winter instead. Why can there not be an event in the spring or in the autumn when the weather is less, extreme?

That is when Enskede Tweed enters. Last year we had a spring event, but this year we decided to have an event in the autumn instead. The event was quickly named höstrusket. It is a Swedish description of the kind of weather in the autumn with lots of rain, yellow leaves on the trees and puddles on the ground. In short, it is a wool-sweater kind of weather.

The date was set to 14th of October. We all had prepared for the real autumn with rain, woollen sweaters, heavy tweed jackets. Some had even planed to use wellingtons and a macintosh. But what happened? The Indian summer came along and treated us with a sunny and warm day instead. The summer tweed and light shoes had to be taken out from the closet again.


Heading towards the meet up

It is tradition that we all meet at the former Gamla Enskede Bageri (old Enskede bakery), now Robin Delselius Bageri, located in the Garden town of Enskede, as it once was called, at noon. The schedule was planned that we had one hour of gathering before the start at one o’clock. There was plenty of time for lunch or a cup of coffee at the bakery/café.


At the café, waiting for the others to arrive


Rex tandem, with the number plate from Stockholm Bike In Tweed still attached

Some of our members wanted to have a quick lunch at the café, specially becasue they have great vegan alternatives on the menu. But on this day, everything vegan was out. They had some salads, but they contained feta-cheese. That was a disappointment for our members.

To be honest, we are missing the old bakery and café. It was a more genuine and rustic feel to it. robust wooden tables and chairs. A section inside where the bakery was located. You could watch them bake the bread and buns. Now it is more a coffee shop feel to the place. But at least we had some coffee and cinnamon buns while making some last minutes adjustments before the start.

At one o’clock all the participants was ready and we began our route around different parts of Enskede.

We duplicated the route from last year. We passed Enskede church and the old town-houses, that was some of the first ones ever built in Sweden. The entire part of Gamla Enskede (Old Enskede) is designed around 1909-1915, so there are many lovely old villas with nice architectural details to look at.

Our ride continued through Gamla Enskede and headed down to Sockenvägen, the large road that leads up from Old Enskede to the main entrance of Skogskyrkogården (the forest cemetery). But instead of going inside the main entrance, we followed the road ahead. Passing the former tram depot from the 1930’s, it was demolished back in mid 1980’s only to be replaced with those horrible 1980’s style flats.


Yellow leaves

A bit further down the road we stopped at the crossing and took a look at the classic neon sign of “Barnvagnsfabriken” that is located on a building at the crossing. Back in the day it was a pram factory and the old vintage neon sign is still up, considering that the factory closed in the 1990’s. Today it is an Italian restaurant located at the premisses.

We turned right and headed down the road that once was the main road from Stockholm to the countryside before they built the highway in the 1960’s. Today it is a nice calm road with large trees on each side of the road. The road follows the cemetery wall.


The old main road, Tyresövägen


Peacefully riding along

We arrived at a new crossroad where an gasoline station once was located when I was a kid. Today there is modern small flats on that location. We turned right and entered the cemetery and rode along Vårhimmesvägen to the exit on the other side of the cemetery. While riding our bicycles inside the forest cemetery we quietly talked and listened to the wind in the trees and the birds singing. Next year we might take a longer route inside the cemetery, it was really peaceful and quiet.


Vårhimmelsvägen, Skogskyrkogården, (Spring-sky-road, Forest cemetery)


All is still and quiet, a piece of Sweden’s deep forests

After exiting the cemetery we went over the highway on an overpass. There we headed down into Tallkrogen. An area that was built in the early 1930’s by people who wanted to have their own homes. After paying a small fee they got a loan and permission to build a small house, the type of houses were called Egnahem “own home” and was founded by Egnahemsbyrån “own homes agency”. There are some areas like this around Sweden from that era, but they are mainly in Stockholm due to the expansion of population in the 1920’s. The town/city of Stockholm bought huge areas from old mansions. It was old farm land and cottages that was converted into entire new population areas.

They all was in reach of the planned subway system, that started to run in 1950. The name Tallkrogen can be translated to “pine pub” and comes from an old inn that was located there back in the 1700’s. Many of these areas has names from the olden days of mansions and cottages, the heritage lives on in the names.

When exiting Tallkrogen and entering the next area, called Svedmyra. That is also a old cottage name that still lives on. There is an small patch of grass between the houses. We had decided to have a short break there with a picnic, it was a nice break with refreshments and a well deserved rest for some of us that were slightly hungover.


Time for a break


More stickers on the Hermes


The handmade sticker for the event, absolutely wonderful drawing


Enjoying the sun

After the rest we started the last leg of the route. It went from Svedmyra and the 1950’s area with flats and into the area of Stureby. The houses in this area was also built on old farm land. But a few years earlier the other areas. It was built in 1920’s so there is interesting architecture. More of individual designs of the houses. We kept peddling on, passing Strureby and crossing the main road and heading down in to the part that is called Enskedefältet (Enskede field) where they built houses just as in Tallkrongen, but only with a different type of houses.


Heading down to Enskede fältet (Enskede field)

The interesting part with this area is that all streets are named after areas in the Baltic’s that once belonged to Sweden. Finland street, Estonia street and so on. After crossing Enskedefältet we finally arrived at the mansion of Enskede gård. The mansion still stands and are take care of. There we gathered around for a group photo to celibate the end of 2018 Enksede Tweed.


Small, but enthusiastic group of tweed riders


A lovely autumn day

After the event we all went to have a cold beer in the garden of Enskede Värdshus (Enskede inn). It was tasty and it was really great to sit and talk. Sadly the inn closed early. It was after autumn and there are not so many guest at that time of year.


Heading down to Enskede värdshus (Enskede inn)


Time for a drink after the finish

It was a great event, we all were pleased and said it was not the last time Enskede Tweed was held. In fact, when we went on our way later on, we meet some participants from other tweed events. They were out just walking around when we happened to passing by. It turned out that they wanted to join Enskede Tweed next time.

Perhaps it will be a popular event? The main question is, will the next event be a spring or autumn event?

Springtime for Tweed

It has been a while since I last wrote here. Well, as usual I have no good excuse for not writing. More that laziness and that the weather has been bad (says the fellow who wrote an article about riding a bicycle in Helsinki in the middle of February).

That is true, but can I say to my defence that I actually had nothing interesting to write about? After all, reading about bicycles and more bicycles can be a bit boring for you. Considering that I once stated that the motto of this blogg was “my view of things around me”. Then the question is, how difficult can it be to write things that are around me? Strangely, not difficult at all.
But, what can I write to still keep the level of my writing style? I can of course write political articles, reviews of things that I tried. I could write endless posts about movies, music, life and so on. But would I like to do that? Strangely, yes and no.


the sticker from Helsinki tweed run is still there

If I started a long time ago and kept it all under one roof, all writings, thoughts and articles collected here under this blogg. Then it would have be a great collection of my views. An time line over what I, as a person, was developing. Different interests and ideas over the years. But after starting this blogg rather recently.  I realized that I wanted to keep it clean, no statements other that “tweed is nice” and “vintage bicycling is the bees knees”, you get the point. An sort of silly, harmless writing about things that offends no one. That is what we really need at this day and age. More harmless silliness about nothing.

So here I am, writing about old bicycles and Tweed hoping that I offend no one.

In fact, now when writing about it. I realize that I never have written anything about tweed it self, the cloth. All my experiences of the cloth with stories from my early teens up to the present. The change in fashion and other ideas all over but how tweed always was important and why a grey herringbone tweed was important for me. Could that be something for you to read?

Or I could write about my ideas for a new bicycle project that I have been thinking of for many years. Once I had an old Swedish military bicycle from the 40’s. Sadly it was in a pretty bad shape and was later even stolen. But today, I would really like to get one again and this time really try to get it in good working order. It would be fun, they are heavy, but reliable!

I can also now officially let you know that I have an vision to participate of 5 different Bicycle Tweed Rides/races/runs this year. That vision brings me to the issue of bicycles in general. After all, I really would love to only have one good vintage bicycle that I could use and participate in different Tweed Rides. But as now, I had different bicycles in every event. There is more articles to write about. In fact, when thinking about it. I have no time to do something else than writing. The questing is how to earn money on writing?

To something completely different. The weather today was an lovely day in the spring with lots of sunshine and chirping birds. In short, it was a perfect day to take the 1956 Hermes bicycle for a ride. I have not moved or looked at it since my return from the Helsinki event, I have not even cleaned it yet. But still the tires had full pressure, nothing on the frame was loose.
I brought my tweed jacket and took a ride. It went smooth as silk. They knew how to make great bicycles back then.


the weather was perfect for an ride with an vintage bicycle, springtime

Happy Tweed!

Winter Tweed Run Helsinki 2017

February 19th was the date set for 2017 version of Winter Tweed Run Helsinki that is held in Finland’s capitol. The meet up for the event was at Senaatintori (the senate square) in central Helsinki, an perfect place to meet. We all had hoped for a sunny day with lots of snow and a at least -20 degrees Celsius bone chilling Nordic winter. But sadly it was +3 degrees and light rain with an heavy overcast instead. This year the weather was more of an dull October day rather than a day in February.

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My Swedish Hermes from 1956 parked on Senaatintori

When I arrived at the square round about noon, I noticed a group of bicyclists standing in front of the stairs leading up to Helsingin tuomiokirkko (Helsinki cathedral). I joined them, after all, they were standing there with vintage bicycles and dressed in tweed. I guessed they were participants of the tweed run. Right away we started to have a chat and I noticed the kindness and friendliness of the riders. Even if we all was trying to make conversations mixed in Swedish, English, Finish all added with home made sign language. More and more riders with their great looking clothes and nice bicycles arrived and joined us. Both modern and vintage bicycles of all styles and models, Swedish, Finish, Indian(?). It was a great mix of everything. Lots and lots of photos were taken, by ourselves and others. Even tourists came up to us and wanted to know more what we were up to looking as we did. It was an relaxed and happy feeling in the light rain on the square.

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The meeting in front of Helsingin tuomiokirkko

Soon the organizers joined us. Sadly I never got their names, but they were very kind and helpful in every way. They welcomed us all individually, shook our hands and gave us stickers as an gift with the events logo for this year. We also got information about an race that is held in the summer of 2017 that looked very tempting to join. After a short while one of the organizers stood up on his bicycle and with a old megaphone and announced to us that we was welcome to the seventh annual Winter Tweed Run Helsinki! He explained that we would take the coastal route around the central part of Helsinki. But first of all we all should get up on the stairs to the cathedral and take a group photography. We took our bicycles and climbed the stairs trying to group ourself for a good and fun photo! One of the organizers used the megaphone and directed us, telling us to cheer seven times to celebrate the event. Sadly I do not have any group photo, but I am sure that it will be available on-line. Somewhere.

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Some of the people behind Winter Tweed Run Helsinki

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The style is a winner!

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I placed the sticker on the frame of my bicycle.

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“Welcome to Helsinki”

After the photo we all made us ready for the start. The direction was given and off we went. It is a fun thing when an race like this starts. Tourists stands still and looks amazed on this large group of bicyclists that are dressed in odd cloths. Not to mention the car drivers surprised looks when they sees about 30 riders in a group riding on the streets.

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Here we are just coming down the stares to for the start of the race.

The goal of the route was an café located on the shore on the other side of Helsinki. It is an regular route that they usually use for this event. It consists of bicycle lanes most of the time, the few times we crossed streets with traffic one of the organizers stopped the cars. Because we were riding in a relative tight formation the car drivers showed an great deal of understanding. After all, it is February and some strange people are riding bicycles, “better to let the bicycles pass…”.

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Crossing a street on our way to the coastal scenery bicycle path around Helsinki

The bicycle lane along the sea shore had lovely scenery of the sea and buildings on the other side. For me it was special, as one of my favourite films from Finland is Calamari Union made by Aki Kaurismäki. Along the ride we went by the area called Eira that is a famous place in that film. It was really great to be there and see it. We took the bicycle lanes further along the way to reach our destination, Café Regatta.

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There was a strong head wind sometimes, but for us that was no problem.

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Some of us stopped to take photos of the sea

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Wide and nice bicycle paths, even for an “lay-down-and-pedal-bicycle”

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More wonderful scenery and surprised bystanders.

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At the Regatta café.

Now we could sit by an open fire or enter the café for a semla pastry and a hot coco, of course with whipped cream on top! Excellent service and really tasty! On the outside we all could talk and admire the bicycles, special made ones, really vintage Crescents, old Hermes and different Finish brands. All sorts of modifications as wine bottle holders and cup holders for coffee that was isolated to keep the heat. The organizers had transport bicycles. One “long John” model that is build as an regular bicycle but has an large luggage rack between the handlebars and the front wheel. The other one was the more common three wheeled version with a large storage box in front. But the most impressive was the fellow dressed in tweed with a cap and an umbrella under his arm while riding all the way on a unicycle! That was truly an amazing sight to see.

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An 1920’s Crescent, all original.

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The details on the bell and worn wooden grips are amazing.

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Hot coco and a semla filled with whipped cream and strawberry jam, it was a real treat. Tasty and delicious.

At the café about half of the riders that started said good bye and left. For example the riders from Sweden needed to go back and catch the boat. After the break we all started again and left for the after party that was held in the northern parts of Helsinki. The road there was sometimes really steep but it was really a nice ride, forest roads and great nature. Suddenly one of the riders bicycle broke down. Everyone was trying to help out, but almost all of us only had tools for vintage bicycles, this was an modern bicycle. But they found a tool that did the job so we went on.

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“Get ready to start”. The megaphone has “speed race” written on it.

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An forest route was planned.

After a while riding of small paths, larger roads, bicycle paths that was covered with ice we arrived at our final destination. It was a club house, where a band should play later on that evening. But up to that point we were welcome to buy some pea and carrot soup, beer and also have a sauna. The kindness among the organizers (I really can not remember their names) was heart warming.

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Our final destination.

After eating some hot and freshly made pea and carrot soup served out of a huge pot, served with mustard. We were few riders that decided to leave this lovely event. I talked to the organizer and thanked him for a lovely day and lovely hospitality. I was so overwhelmed by all expressions, when saying good buy I mistook an honest hug for a odd handshake.
I am still ashamed for my awkwardness.

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The smile says it all, it was a good day.

Finally, my personal thoughts on Winter tweed run Helsinki 2017 are simple and straight forward. It was a great event with no rules more than just to have fun and having a great time. But if there will be an Helsinki tweed run 2018, I will plan it way better. Sauna, beer, bicycles and music, count me in.

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On the way back to Helsinki city

Kiitos paljon!

The mystery bicycle, part 1

Some weeks back I visited an bicycle shop in the central parts of Stockholm. I was looking for some old bicycles. I had been asked if I knew any old bicycles that some friends could use for the Bike in tweed event for next year, 2016. It seems that the Bike in Tweed event has become a huge success so more people wants to join. Since I like old bicycles and know were to look, I was asked to do some research for the friends.

This shop I visited is what I call a real bicycle repair shop. There is not a clean spot anywhere to be found. The smell of old grease and rubber from old tires hits you when entering. The workers got old grease up to their elbows, that is a sign of working and having an interest. There are some good shops for vintage bicycles in Stockholm, but this place is genuine as a shop used to be. Own by people that loves bicycles. There are bicycles everywhere, parts everywhere, bits and pieces all over the place. But they know every part of the shop. All things, pieces and tools are in the right place, in an odd but nice way. I had been there some time earlier and looked at their range of old bicycles. They had some really nice ones, mainly old Swedish brands standing in corners of the shop. They vintage ones was mixed with newer models, a really good selection for everyone.

As I mentioned in this post, I got an idea of building an bicycle by using the parts from my grandfathers bicycle. My idea was a black roadster, in a 1930s style. So I decided to visit the old shop again and ask them if they had an old bicycle for sale that I was looking for. I explained the style I was aiming for. I think I even said that I was looking for a project to work on and it was for the 2016 Bike in Tweed.
The fellow I was talking listened and understood what I was going for, he remembered that he had seen an project that might be suitable for me. “Follow me”, he said and walked in to the shops storage.

We walked in to the really small rooms in the back, there up on some water pipes hanging from the ceiling was an old frame laying covered in dust and spider web. He took it down and said that it was an old Swedish 28 inch wheel frame that might suit me as an project to build and develop. The frame had no name badge so it was a mystery what maker it was. It had screw holes on the head of the frame for a badge. I got a feeling of remembering the pattern of the screw holes from somewhere. But my memory was blank for the moment.
He asked me if I was interested of the frame. If I was, then they could look for more parts and also build the bicycle for me. Of course, I was really interested of the parts. But I said that I would like to build it myself. After all I have been repairing bicycles since I was a kid and I still think it is really fun to repair and fix old bicycles. I told them that I would come back a few weeks later so they could find the parts that was needed for the project in their own time.

At my next visit, they had found some mudguards that had the same colour scheme as the frame, black with gold trimming. But sadly no wheels. But, they had some rims that matched the mudguards and the frame. But there was no spokes or hubs. That is no problem for me, I had a rear hub from 1935 that was very common on Swedish bicycles in those days. Besides I have wanted to build a wheel for some time now. With the winter around the corner, it could be a fun lesson for me. Building wheels where 36 spokes need to be mounted in a special order and tighten so the wheel is true. It will be fun!

To day I collected the first batch of parts. I brought a big plastic bag and carried the parts home. Now comes the part that I really like, cleaning and making sure that the parts are in a good shape. De-greasing, cleaning and polishing all the parts. As I was unpacking all parts in my basement I remember the screw holes on the frame. Now I even remembered where I have been seeing the pattern before. It was the pattern of the Hermes badge that is on one of my other vintage bicycle. But with one difference, the pattern is for the older, 1930’s style badge. So now we know what brand it is, it is an Hermes made in the Swedish town of Uppsala. With that information, I can now focus on getting the correct parts for the build. I am thinking of documenting the build here on this blogg if you like?

I will most likely spend the winter in the basement building an 80 year old bicycle so why not write about it and take photos to? After all, it could be worse.

I could be sitting outside in the snow, building a 80 year bicycle.

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