The black bicycle, part 6

As I have mentioned in an earlier post. My first intention was to build the bicycle as a kind of homage to the old bicycle that I remembered from my childhood. An old worn bicycle painted black, reliable and made to be used all year around.

I have built a bicycle that is not like a regular bicycle generally speaking. There are no mudguards, no rear luggage rack to place suitcases or a chainguard. The bicycle also have narrow pedals, not the broad ones that are easy to get a good grip on. To be honest, the bicycle I have created looks more like a 1930’s racer.


The new look…


…is really great

Why then is it not a racer, I hear you ask?  Well, it is painfully simply.

Firstly due to the chain wheel. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I got it from the old bicycle at an auction last year and used it as a donor bicycle for parts that were needed. The chain wheel is a original Crescent wheel. But it is a standard wheel with only 48 teeth.

The sporty Crescent racers from that era used almost all only chain-wheels with 52 teeth. The mission of trying to find a used 52 teeth wheel from 1930’s today, is rather difficult, if not impossible.

Not to mention the problems of finding mudguards that was used on the racers of that era. Or any mudguards that fits the frame and style. I have looked around, asked on vintage bicycle sites, looked in storages of used bicycle shops for a pair of mudguards that fits. Both in size and in style with the Crescent frame. No luck at all so far.


48 teeth chain-wheel with narrow pedals


I used a pair of vintage Nymans made pedals that I had laying in a drawer, they fit the general look

I decided to keep the bicycle as it is. It is not not the black painted vintage bicycle from 1930’s I was longing for. But it is A vintage bicycle from 1930’s, that someone have painted black many years ago.

I fitted the old frame with parts from the 1930’s that I had laying around. Worn parts that fits the style of the bicycle. For example the black painted wooden grips on the handlebar, where the brass is showing beneath the metal plating on the end parts.

The scratched and oxidized bicycle bell on the handlebar is a masterpiece in design by itself with its red and white emblem still intact. Mounted on the frame is an 1930’s battery box made by Berko.  I wound the cloth covered cords around the frame to complete the 1930’s look. From the battery pack, one cord leads to the front light and one leads to the rear light. The entire set up make the bicycle seem to go faster. If not, more dangerous.


Bicycle bell with Lindblads emblem and wooden grip on the handlebar


The 1920’s style square bolt on the stem, the handlebar is modern. It is from 1940’s.


A stem clamp I reused. Made by Wiklunds, a different Stockholm based bicycle maker in the 1930’s.

I replaced the modern Brooks saddle with an old worn vintage saddle with double springs and the classic spring loop in the front. Or a “safety pin” saddle, as they were called back then. By changing the saddle I could use the original “T” shaped seat post from 1930’s. Now the entire bicycle looks like it has been in storage since the early 1930’s.


Look at those impressive springs, this is a very comfortable saddle. Also notice the “t” shaped saddle post

After the work I did on the bicycle, taking every part of the bicycle into pices, pedals, frame, crank-set, front fork all the ball bearings in the crank case and front fork. The same procedure with the front and rear hubs. Clean, lubricate and mount them after checking for wear and tear and adding a small drop of oil on the threads on nuts and bolts.

The black HF-110 Duro tires looks great and having the rear hub sprocket changed along with the chain, tightening screws and adjustments. The bicycle was almost ready. The very last thing I needed to do was to add a small drop of oil to the metal parts on the saddle. They were causing friction and made a irritating squeaking noise whenever I sat on the saddle. We can not have squeaking noises when riding a bicycle. A small drop of oil is often the solution.


Close up of the winded cord along the frame and the Berko headlight

I took a long test ride and tried the bicycle out a few days ago. My first impressions are that it is a really good bicycle. When I was going down a hill, the entire bicycle seemed to transform itself into an arrow. It was travelling straight, fast and silent. The hubs were working like a charm, I must have done a great job when refurbish them. While riding along the streets, the only sound possible to notice from the bicycle was the sound of the tires spinning on the the tarmac.

I think this bicycle is a “keeper” for me. It is a great bicycle after all. But for it to be a really, really great bicycle. I would like to change the front chain wheel to the larger 52 teeth instead of the current one with 48 teeth. Why? Well, a larger front chain wheel looks better and it was they used back then.

It was not bad, for a bicycle created with parts that I had laying around or got fairly cheep. I feel that the old Crescent frame that was made by Lindblads in Stockholm back in late 1920’s got a second chance.

The black bicycle simply become the “Black arrow” in a way. Silent, fast and looking sleek as can be. The quick release nuts on the wheels sure give away that this bicycle will go fast. Everyone knows that a set of wheels with quick release nuts spells “sport” and goes fast, right?


Detail of the rear light, a nice facet shaped glass.

But in fairness, it is not the black bicycle I was looking for. Perhaps the black bicycle of my dreams, is just a dream. Created by memories from the days when my father was taking a ride to visit my grandparents cottage outside the city while I was sitting on the frame and enjoying the breeze.

For me it all is about memories of summer holidays. Eating raspberry’s straight from the bushes while laying in the grass looking at the sky. Listening to the sounds of the forest and the wildlife and riding that black old bicycle.

Perhaps it all should remain as memories, a dream from my childhood. After all, it was many years ago and those long, raspberry eating, summer days will never return.

Perhaps the old black bicycle still exists? Who knows.

 

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Swedish attack bicycle m/105A

Well, to be honest. It is not effective as an attack bicycle, more a excellent and quick transportation on small roads in the forest.

Sweden, as many other country’s have been using bicycles as a effective and quick transportation for the military forces for ages. In Sweden bicycles was mainly mused by the infantry, but bicycles were in all military branches. The air force, the navy as well.

In the army there were dedicated bicycle platoons with all sorts of configurations of bicycles. Some had mounting possibility for hooking up a trailer. There was a medical version for a stretcher being placed between two bicycles (sounds completely dangerous). One version even had a platform mounted on the frame where guard dogs could sit while riding along with the rider.

From the start the Swedish military named the bicycle after the year they were introduced in the service. The first model was m/1901, the m stands for “model” and 1901 the year. After that there was m/1927, m/30, m42, m/104, m/105 and finally m/111. Yes, I know. It is strange that they changed from using the year with four digits as model number to only use two digits and finally end up with a 100 series. Perhaps to confuse the enemy?


Monark made m/105A in it’s natural environment


A previous owner had painted 107 on the toolbox as well as F22 on the front mudguard at some point in time as a joke. F22 was the name of the Swedish air flotilla that was set up in Africa as UN forces between 1961 and 1963

With those old military bicycles comes lots of memories for many of us who did the compulsory military service. During the 20th century every young man (some women to) was drafted to serve about 7-10 months in a military regiment. Infantry, armour, navy, coastal artillery, air force and so on. Every one of these branches had these bicycles, so almost every one have used old bicycles in the classical green colour.

During some transports there used to be something like towing. A line with handles behind a tractor or a lorry where the bicycle riders used to hold on, they were placed in a zigzag pattern. In Sweden that was a common practise for large transportations. Madness, but it worked. Many of the former military service personel gets nostalgic when seeing towing after a tractor, or just by seeing a old military bicycle the memories comes back of the morning roll call, yellow pea soup and pancakes on Thursdays.


Chain wheel and detail of the handle that are mounted on the frame for carrying the bicycle

All those memories. I was told by an elderly family member long ago that when he was did his service during the war he fell asleep while riding his bicycle during a manoeuvre. Suddenly he had fallen out of the ranks and found him self on a field.  My father told me that when he was doing his military refresher training back in the late 1960’s being placed in the armoured forces.

One day they as the all were sitting and waiting for something (it was a lot of waiting in the military service). When a tank suddenly rolled up the street where they were. On the middle of the road someone had left a military bicycle. The tank commander in the conning tower noticed the bicycle. The tank rolled over the bicycle, stopped and made a pivot turn (in Swedish it is called a centre turn, meaning the tanks left and right tracks are running opposite each other making the tank turn around its own axis) right above the bicycle.

After the turn was complete, the commander ordered the driver to drive on. On the ground remained the twisted and totally destroyed bicycle. The commander was the famous race driver Picko Troberg.


Military marked (three crowns logo) original tires


Trelleborg T-nabb tires


Toolbox on the luggage rack with the makers name, Monark

When I did my 15 months military service in the navy, we in the staff had military bicycles on the base to move around quickly. I used an old m/42 with leather saddle, wooden handles and a front brake manoeuvred by a large metal bar that was integrated in the handlebars. It was so comfortable to ride that I borrowed it many times when riding to the shop outside the base. We even borrowed the bicycles one summer day when we were “awol” (absent without official leave) and went for a swim in the sea. Packing sandwiches and a towel in our military bags, strapping them on the luggage racks and riding to the beach. The officers were not so happy, but it was a really nice day.


Front light and detail of the spring on the frame that keeps the handlebars straight when being lifted


Even the military needs a bicycle bell. The classic “Pärlan / pearl” design in military green


Details of the protection frame for the rear light and the m/42 design of luggage rack with tool box

In fact I was so pleased with the m/42 bicycle I used in the navy that I a few years later went to a military surplus shop just outside Stockholm and bought an old decommissioned military m/42 bicycle. that still got hay stuck in the hubs. I had it for many years until it was sadly stolen.

Many years later a friend asked me if I wanted his old military bicycle. He thought it was to heavy and clumsy for him to use. I took a look at it and discovered it to be an m/105A version. A later version of the m/42. I realized right away that the rear break was in desperate need of service. The bicycle sounded like an old tram when braking and the rear wheel locked up at the slightest thought of using the rear break. I rode the bicycle home in the night avoiding breaking.

Later that week I dismounted the rear break cleaned the break drum, the break pads, lubricated all the parts that had not been lubricated sin 1972. Mounted it all together and it worked like a charm.


Fichtel & Sachs drum brake model HR 90 V.

The m/105A was made my the bicycle maker Monark in the 60’s, made from surplus parts both from the other bicycle makers Crescent and Husqvarna. I have no idea how many that were made, but since they are almost everywhere it must have been enormous amounts of bicycles in the military services. The advantage with these old bicycles is that parts are available almost anywhere, documents and instructions are easy to find. After all, the kids that were drafted had to do all the service them self, so they needed instructions for it all.


The content of the toolbox, it is all there except the bicycle pump…


…of course marked with three crowns…


…as well as the steering column

Later on I guess more or less all bicycles were decommissioned from their long service. Surplus and traders made the bicycles spread all over Sweden. I remember that the m/42 I bought back in 1992 costed me about £25. They were cheep and sturdy bicycles.

First they where everywhere in the military services, then they where everywhere in the civilian. You can still find them, in apartment bicycle storages, out in bicycle stands in the city. Almost every bicycle shop has one for sale.


With 26″ balloon tires you can ride on any surface and still experience comfort in the saddle

If maintained properly, it is an reliable and great bicycle that can take a lot of abuse.
Only being crushed under a tank might be a problem.

London Tweed Run 2018

10th London Tweed Run was held on Saturday the 5th of May 2018.

The London event is an enormously popular event with about 1000 participants each year. It is said to be the original tweed cycling event like this. Since there are now so many people that want to ride their bicycles while dressed in their finest tweeds, it has become necessary to sell advance tickets to those who want to participate. The event is so popular that all the tickets completely sell out online in a matter of seconds. A few years ago the tickets were sold out in 90 seconds. This year it only took 4 minutes until all tickets were sold.

I have been wanting to join London Tweed Run for a few years just to have been there, but it was never possible and I never tried really hard. But this year it was the 10th anniversary, I decided to try to get hold of a ticket. After trying to access the site on-line I found out that all tickets were sold out again. But there was a message letting me know that – if I wanted to – I could join a waiting list in case of any tickets were available later. I signed up just for fun and did not think more of that.
Three weeks later, I got an email saying that there was one ticket available if I wanted it. I bought it without hesitation.


My hat and some refreshments before the flight to London

Now, the logistics needed to be solved. I booked a hotel. That was easy. But how should I get my bicycle to London from Stockholm? I looked up different companies that offered bicycle as luggage on air planes. But then the question remained, how should I get the bicycle in a huge box from the airport to the hotel? There must be a better way.

After some research I discovered a business called Tally-Ho Cycle Tours. After some email exchanges with Mr Harris there, I booked a black 28″ Pashley Roadster bicycle for me to collect on the actual day of the event.

The day came, I went down in the London underground and travelled the tube while dressed in tweed, listening to old jazz in my headphones just to get myself in the mood. I arrived early at Tally-Ho cycles and met Mr Harris, a very nice and kind man. He brought me my bicycle for the day, adjusted it so it would fit me. While I was At Tally-Ho, I saw others dressed in tweed, trying their rented bicycles.


Bicycles with baskets at Tally-Ho cycles


Pashely roadsters waiting to be a part of the Tweed Run

Since I was an international participant I needed to be early at the Tweed Run start area to receive my starting number and a welcome pack of documents with information about the ride. On my way to the start area that was located outside the Imperial War Museum, I spotted yet more tweed riders and also a group of ladies dressed in 1940’s style clothes, all heading towards the Imperial War Museum. I was not alone. It always feels better when seeing other ‘Tweedians’ when one is in a new place. It assures me that I am at the right location.


Being one among the first at the start


I met Francisco at the start

It has happened before, it will happen again. I was early, really early. I was among one of the first 10 people at location. The ladies I had noticed earlier were setting up distribution points to hand out the rider packages. I was in the right place.

There I was, standing in the park with my bicycle and reading a book in the lovely summer weather, waiting to collect my rider package. I met Francisco, a man from Portugal but living in Belgium that I had seen earlier at Tally-Ho Cycles. We chatted about the event and where we were from. As we were talking, Martin from Germany joined us along with his wife. Then Lisbeth and Stefan from Netherlands turned up. We were truly an international group, talking bicycles and tweed and just having fun.


The sun is coming out, it is going to be a lovely day


Tweed and bicycles


Marin and I are admiring his original -50’s Adler

That is the Tweed Run spirit: diverse people meeting and talking and having fun. Lisbeth, Stefan and Francisco had all been at a London Tweed Run before. But for Martin and me it was the first time, in fact it was to be Martin’s first tweed event.

As we talked, around us there were reporters conducting interviews and many other tweed riders talking bicycles and clothes.

Suddenly we heard the sound of loud horns and a man shouting. It was time to begin the 12 mile long bicycle ride around London. Almost 1000 riders peddling down the narrow roads. It was fun, I met many lovely people along the way.


Time for the start, around 1000 riders


Falcon enamel cups, tandem bicycle, picnic and a baby on board.


Westminster bridge with the parliament and a covered Elizabeth tower (Big Ben).


The marshals did an excellent work guiding us riders around London


Climbing the hill at The Waldorf hotel

We rode across Westminster Bridged and headed to Covent Garden and then along the streets up to Russell Square, just beside British Museum. Pedestrians were waving, smiles and happy faces accompanied by hundreds of bicycle bells chiming. But now it was time for a tea break!


Gentleman with a boater hat having a break


A happy girl, with a lovely outfit. The barre with feathers are simply adorable.


Russel square park and Tweed Run tea break


Dashing chaps


Style, elegance and a positive attitude. An example for us all


Interviews, this time by German reporters

It was a lovely break within a glorious setting. The green park, trees creating an idyllic location for this event. The tea wagon was pouring out tea in lovely cups. That is where I met the Norwegian Tweed Run delegation. We talked and had fun.


Tea in the park


More tweed chaps

After refreshing ourselves with the tea it was time to set off again. Now we headed towards the area of Marylebone and rode straight across London Zoo to enter Camden Town where we all rode along the tow-path beside the canal. Now, that was an adventure. Narrow, water one one side, pedestrians on the other. We were told to ride on a single file, not stopping to take photos. There was simply no room.


The adventures canal stretch. Lovely, but narrow

In fact, I was insulted by an elderly man who was annoyed by the appearance all the riders. Having chosen not to ride too close to the edge of the canal, I took a line a bit closer than normal to the bench where the old man was sitting.

“That’s right, cycle a bit closer you fat bastard” I head the man yell at me.

There was no time for stopping and talking to the man. Onwards!


Hair and matching bicycle


A marshal guiding us


I guess that France was represented on this event


Spring and pre-summer in London


Camden town by bicycle

After Camden we entered St: Pancras where we had a picnic at Gasholder park. There were food vendors nearby and a shop for drinks and simpler food further down the road. I was taking a rest when I meet Martin again, we all had been separated during the ride. We talked for a bit, he said that he was going to buy something to drink. I said that I could keep an eye on his vintage German made Alder bicycle while he went away.


Gasholder park, not so romantic picnic location

After a while he came back, he had bought along a sandwich, water and some crisps for us to eat. That was very kind of him. I thanked him deeply. Then we sat there and talked in German in London at an tweed event. That is what makes happy memories!

We later met Lisbeth and Stefan again, but sadly lost track of Francisco. Suddenly we heard a loud cheer! It was then we realized that there had been a group photo opportunity. We and many other riders were still standing in the shade of the gas clocks when they took the photo. It was a pity that there was no better information about the time for the photo.


Time for the final section of the Tweed Run before the finish

Then it was time to make our way again. Bicycle bells were chiming, horns hooting and people cheering. Time for the final leg of the ride. Up and down the hills of Clerkenwell, where Martin and I joined up for the rest of the journey. We laughed and had a great time. Suddenly we were at the finish line at Spa Fields Park. I parked my bicycle and almost directly found Mr Harris from Tally-Ho, they were collecting their bicycles from there as a service for those who would like a gin and tonic at the party.


Finish line at Bourne & Hollingsworth at Spa Fields park in Clerkenwell


Now that is the image of an English gentleman

Sadly I needed to go, I was about to meet a long time friend later that evening. After all it was my first time in London for 17 years, we had much to catch up with and a long ride in front of us.

In the end, London Tweed Run was a great event. Happy, friendly great looking people. The use of official marshals who stood on corners and directed all of us was a great feature. Also the relaxed atmosphere with riders smiling and chatting with drivers of cars, buses and taxis. I would say that almost everyone adjusted to the situation.


Quite Brittish

I have been to many tweed rides. It was fun to experience the original one. How was it arranged, how they prepared the event and other small details. The only disadvantages I noticed was that the ride alongside the canal was too narrow for so many riders and perhaps, looking back, a mistake. Also, that so many riders were not aware that there was a group photo taking place along the route and missed being in it for posterity. Why didn’t they take the group photo at Imperial War Museum, like last year? That would have been calmer and easier to gather all participants on one photo.

Also the location of the lunch break at Gasholder Park was a bit odd. Seeing all these wonderfully attired people sitting on blankets directly on old concrete was not so charming. Only the marshals and other exclusive members got to sit on the grass at the Gasholder Park. If the lunch had instead been held along with the tea break at Russell Square, there would have been perfect scenery for this particularTweed Run.

Blankets on the grass, tea, sandwiches, tweed and bicycles. That would have been lovely!

Thank you for a long, lovely, unique day!

Cheers!

 

PS: I like to thank Mr Withers for all help along the way, before, during and after the event.

The £20 bicycle

A few days ago I got a message from a fellow bicycle friend. He had been at an auction in search for a set of wheels for his new project. When going home he did not only have a set of wheels with him. He had an entire bicycle with him. It was a black 1930’s style bicycle without any badges or names at all. The rear hub was made by Torpedo and had the stamp of 36 on it. When he came home and started to look closely at the bicycle, he noticed that the wheels was not the type he was looking for. So what to do? After all he had paid £20 for it.


The find at the auction

I had some parts he needed, sp we simply made a trade. I got the old no-name bicycle and he got some parts he needed to his project. Parts like a vintage rear light, a dynamo and a few other small things that I had in my storage.

The £20 bicycle was now mine. It was painted black over the original red finish. Most likely had someone painted it black in a hurry because there was places under the bicycle that still had parts of red showing. There was a fairly modern luggage rack, a 90’s bell mounted on the handlebars, 80’s pedals with reflectors and an plastic saddle. But most odd was the padlock attached to the head light holder. Judging of the ware and tear of the paint on the frame underneath the holder and the oxidation on the padlock. It has been there for quite a long time.


Decades of dirt and grease. But the colour red is clearly visible.

My first idea was to strip the entire bicycle and perhaps re use the frame to a project. But after looking at it. It started to grow on me. It was a original bicycle, really old and used. The wheels needs attention, one spoke on the rear wheel is broken, other spokes are loose. That is easy to fix, I have spokes and tightening the spokes is really easy. The front wheel was wobbling really bad. But after checking it out I realized that it was an matter of disassembly the front hub and take a look.


Not the best of conditions, but after cleaning and lubrication it was all fine again

When I removed the wheel and started to disassembly the hub, I noticed why it has been wobbling. Some ball-bearings were missing, one of them was even cut in half! I cleaned it all from grease that had been there over the years. Got a few new bearings and greased up the hub with new grease. I noticed that there was some nuts on the axle missing that make sure the hub does not unscrews it self, where had those gone? There was no traces of them at all. Perhaps someone removed them back in the 1950’s. Those nuts are easy to replace, but now it was a matter of making the wheel spin.

The rear hub, well that was a different story. Years of rust, grit, grime, smudge, filth and grease on layer upon layer. There was no way I could open it with out working with a lot of de-greasers agents, rust-removers and plenty of elbow grease. But since the hub was in rather good condition. There was no rattle or clunks. I decided to mount the wheel back again with out cleaning and lubricating the rear hub.


Fichtel & Sachs Torpedo hub marked 36. That puts it at 1936

Then I started the process of removing all parts that was wrong. I replaced the 1980’s rusty single stand to a vintage double stand. The pedals were replaced with large ones, also original from 1930’s. The luggage rack was removed, I was thinking of mounting a flat iron style luggage rack instead. But that is for next time.


Changing the pedals, in the background is the luggage rack on the floor

Then I turned the bicycle over again. While the bicycle was standing up I replaced the saddle with a nameless 1930’s one I bought many years ago but never got around to use. In a drawer I had an old ASEA headlight that was rusty and had cracked glass, I fitted it on the lamp-holder, it was a snug fit over the padlock, but it looks just great and worked like a charm. I had an old Husqvarna bell that I mounted after removing the horrible modern bell.


It looks great with all the worn parts I had laying around

In a box of all sorts of old worn bicycle parts I found an old, dirty and worn ASEA dynamo that I mounted and adjusted so it fitted. I connected the dynamo and headlight with an really old cord. It wrapped it around the frame, just as they use to do back then.


ASEA lamp and dynamo, connected with an even older cord


Original grips, worn and weather beaten


The oil nipple is missing and have been for a long time, I need to find one of those


I will try to get a nice reflector to the rear fender, or a registration sign

It turned out to be quite a nice bicycle. The frame is a bit on the small side for me. But as a bicycle to be used at winter rides it is a great bicycle. After all I have wither tires with studs that needs to be used.

The £20 bicycle got a new life as a vintage “beater”. Re-cycling at it’s best.

Spring cleaning

It was a long winter!

That is not a problem for us with bicycles. You can ride a bicycle and enjoy the cold, but fresh air while avoiding ice patches and cars that are stuck in the snow and skidding along. A lonely winter road with packed snow as road surface is just lovely.

But sadly that kind winter wonderland roads are scarce when living in a large city that are filled to the limits with cars, lorry’s and people rushing around all the time. Perhaps the first week after a heavy snow storm it might be lovely snowy roads in the city. But as soon as the road crews are out with their sanding machines, the before snowy white winter wonderland roads turns into large swamps of grey melted slush.


Seen in the city, a brave motorcycle rider defies the elements

They spread the sand on streets, pavements, cars, people and forest paths. The sand is everywhere! On the main roads they also use salt. Road salt that melts the ice so the cars got good grip. It works!

But when it is cold the snow do not melt, instead it turns in to boring, grey, salty slush. Riding a bicycle in that kind of slush is not fun at all. First of all, the bicycle tires are not made for that kind of artificial road surface. When the snow is packed it is all just fine! But when having to cruise in 10 centimetres thick greyish swamp-ish slush that are covering roads it is a different matter. The tires just keeps digging down into the slush, snow and ice.


A ride in the first days of spring

The slush get stuck on everything, wheels, mudguards, luggage rack, clothes, its is everywhere. The really sad part is that the salty grey slush also corrodes metal quick! That is really quick! After riding in that kind of poisons slush the important thing is to wash the bicycle with water and keep it stored inside rather quickly.

After the Helsinki Tweed Run my two bicycles was covered with a thick  layer of that corroding grey salt slush. I do not have any place to wash the bicycles so all I did was wiped them fairly clean with a cloth right away after arriving home again (the cloth turned black after the wiping). My intention was to ride the bicycles one at the time to a car wash at an petrol station nearby. They have separate stalls for car washes where you wash your car by hand. You pay a fee and get to use the wash equipment for a limited time.


Just finished washing the 1956 Hermes at the petrol station.

As soon the snow melted a bit and it was relative dry outside. I took the bicycles for a ride to the car wash. I guess many of the car owners raised their eyebrows a bit when they saw me standing there washing a old bicycle instead of a car.

I covered the sensitive parts on the bicycles like saddle, handlebar grips, headlights and cranks with old plastic bags. After that I covered the entire bicycle with a cleaning agent and then washed and rinsed  it all with water. Final treatment in the wash was to use a new cloth to dry the bicycle and polish the chrome/nickel parts.


1938 Wiklunds, Nordstjärnan (Northen star) got a well deserved wash. Not the Helsinki tram rails rust on the front tire. That will never go away. A visible memory an an fun event.

After cycling home and enjoying the first warm rays of spring, I dismounted the wheels and greased the axles and bearings with new grease and a drop of oil where needed. Even the spring to the stand was creaking after all corrosive salt slush from the winter. It got cleaned and lubricated with a drop of oil.

Polishing and cleaning. That is a spring event. A sure way to say good bye to the winter and greet the spring welcome.


Badly parked after the wash, the Hermes is placed inside until warmer weather


Nordstjärnan in the sunlight