Pelago Path Roadster?

Do you remember the Pelago path racer I build from parts a while ago? If you do not remember, I do not blame you at all. There has been so many bicycles on this blogg that even I get the feeling of being lost among all names and brands. Pelago, Hermes, Snabb, Rex, Hella and more Hermes. But after all, bicycles are fun to handle and repair. They are cheep to, well not all obvious. For example my own version of an retro bicycle.


Pelago in nature

A few years ago I had an idea of building a path racer, a racing bicycle but with modern parts. Back then retro racers was not so common, Pashley had their Guvn’or and later on the Speed 5 model. Really lovely looking models. So I got a silly idea. Why not build one my self? Now I know the reason why I never should attempted the build. The first I needed to get was a frame that I liked. Pelago in Helsinki was very helpful and kind. They sold me a frame that I could base my build on. I started to look on internet for parts, wheels, tyres, chain wheel, pedals, cranks, seat post (how many parts are there on one bicycle..), seat, handlebars, stem, grips, brakes, chain, tubes, lubrications for the moving parts and tools to put it all together.


Brooks B135 saddle with a Brooks bag that of course contains a Pelago multi tool

After buying, trying, fitting and testing all parts I assembled with the help from another bicycle enthusiast. The Pelago Path Racer was born! It was really nice, slim and great looking it its all shiny black frame with chrome details and golden chain. But there was one problem. I could not use it! The seating position was a murder for my back. The angle of having to lean forward to reach the handlebars was killing my back. OF course I am not in the shape now, that I was when I was 15 years old and invincible. But I realize that I want to ride a bicycle in a more upright position instead of bending like a boomerang over forwards to even be able to grip the handlebar. In short, I needed a roadster so I can sit with a straight back and enjoy the ride more!

What to do with the Pelago racer? Well to be fair, I tried to sell it. I realized that I would never get back the money I put on all the parts for the racer. So I tried to sell the bicycle, way cheaper than I bought the parts for. But no one was genuine interested, only comments like “what a great bike” or “now that is the one I would love to have”. Finally, I was tired of trying to sell the bicycle. At that time a new thought was building in my head. Why not build it as an Roadster instead? After all it is a simple start by only shifting the handlebars upside down.


The Pelago path racers new look with the handlebars turned up

After that I thought that I would like to build a international bicycle. Finnish frame, Japanese hubs, Australian chain wheel, Chinese chain, Swedish handlebars and grips, English seat. Why not an German hand brake?

One very many older German made bicycles they have an lever system handbrake that presses a rubber pad against the front wheel. I knew this website in Germany that sells bicycle parts. I looked on their site and founded that they sell new made front hand brakes of that lever style. That would look really stylish on the black Pelago. At the same time I ordered an set of black painted mud guards for the Pelago.

After very short time I received an package with all parts I had ordered. One evening I went down into the basement and started to fitting the parts on the bicycle. The German style front brake was really stylish and looked very continental. The major draw back I quickly found was that I could not use the front mud guard along with the lever brake. There was no clearance what so ever between the tyre and the mud guard to be able to fit the rubber brake pad. That was a real shame. There was three options.
1, Keep the lever brake, but saw of the front part of the mudguard
2, Remove the lever brake and keep the calliper brake
3, Remove the front mud guard and the calliper brake

I went with number 2. But in the process I snapped one of the adjustment screw for the rods on the German style lever brake. That made me sad, it is a great looking break leaver. But now it is almost useless, simply because I do not have any replacement screws.


Calliper breaks on the front wheel, the tire is a Schwalbe Delta cruiser

After some time in the basement I finally had assembled the Pelago Roadster. It had become more grown, mature almost, bicycle. I even bought an black double stand at the local autoparts store and mounted some Pelago stickers on the frame. The sticker for the year 2017 Enskede Tweed Ride was added too. After all, that is a proof for attending the Tweed ride I organized. The ride was held in south of Stockholm and a friend of mine who had no bicycle asked me if I had one he could borrow for the ride. Of course, you can use my Pelago, said I.

After all years I had it standing in the basement without using it finally it was out on the roads and being used as it should. My friend said it was a lovely bicycle and he wanted to borrow it again. That is a good grade for me as a builder, to make something that others like. That is a really rewarding feeling.


Great looking details, the chain tensioners, the double stand, golden chain.

A while back I visited the Pelago store in Helsinki. As always it is nice to visit them, always helpful and understanding with my silly and strange questions. This time I even almost happened to knock a person over while he was taking photos of the staff. I was a bit out of my mind so I simply walked right in instead of waiting for them to take the photo. I hope they can forgive me.

My reason to visit the shop was to ask for some stickers, one can never have enough with stickers. On the images above you can notice a sticker on the seat post tube of the frame. I got that one from Pelago a few years back and applied it on the frame, it sure looks great. Sadly they were out of stickers this time, but the staff was so kind that they looked in some drawers and found some spare stickers that I could have. Now that is service! Visiting the place where they make the bicycles and speak with the staff, even after trying to run down the staff like a rugby player when entering the shop. Thank you Pelago! I will be back.


The stickers I got from Pelago

But in the end I am afraid that I will never use the bicycle to 100%. Sadly I never got along with my build. The Pelago Bristol, the model which frame I bought  is a great, well build and a great ride. But my build on the other hand, is a bit uncomfortable to ride due to only my own silly ideas. If I wanted an new Roadster style bicycle I would have chosen the Bristol any day. But I wanted an retro racer back then. When looking back I should have bought an Pashley Guvnór or Pashley Speed 5. One reason is that they are great looking, but also it is an investment since they are so special. But it would have been problems for me with the riding position, no matter what.

My Pelago was an adventure and learning experience. It was really interesting to find parts, visit the Pelago shop in Helsinki. In the end finally have a compete bicycle that I designed. After all, it is really great looking bicycle.


Pelago Path Racer, now a modern style Roadster

Reflections and thoughts about the bicycles

There comes a time in a mans life when he realizes that he has to many bicycles. Is that even a thing Can it even be possible? Can one have to many bicycles, I hear you ask.

Yes, you can! When you have a very limited space in a cold, dark basement. When you can not enter that space due to the simple reason that the bicycles (and all the crates filled with all sorts of bicycle parts) are blocking all access to anything anywhere.After all I need space to prepare the bicycles for bike in tweed 2016.

Situations like that demands actions, no matter what! So, I decided to sell one of my old bicycles to a girl I know. She was very happy for it and wanted to try it at once, I adjusted the seat and off she went. It was nice to see her riding on a bicycle from 1941. She handled it with grace and style. Even the bicycle seemed happy, not a squeak or creek anywhere. An vintage bicycle like that one, 28″ tires and a steal frame, then you can not rush, it is a promenade bicycle. Simply climb up, and gently pedal away into the smoothness that only 28″ balloon tires can offer. She took the old bicycle for a short ride, on the way back she had a big smile on her face. That smile made it all worth for me. The happiness of others that appreciates the feeling and joy of something old, the small details and things that makes a vintage bicycle so great. The comfort, the design, the way it handles. Simple but well thought of functions like the double stand, the decorative and functional holders for the bicycle pump. All made locally and designed for usage. Not a plastic “34-geared-race-use-now-throw-away-later” bicycle. The old ones was made to last. Built like tanks!

In the basement there are more bicycles standing, waiting for my attention. I have made some minor updates on some older ones. For example the Rex tandem have received an original front mudguard ornament and a better looking reflector on the rear mudguard. Lady Blue have a new set of tires. The tires I fitted had the makers horrible colourized brand name on the tire wall. It looked horrible! But I have found a retailer that sells tires with a vintage tread pattern and a very nice vintage looking tire. The white lightning will get a new life as a retro racer with a new owner soon, more of that in a post further on.

The black painted Hermes frame from 1934 with its the wheels I mentioned last time. Is still missing a front fork. After all, if I am going head over heels to make it perfect. Then the front fork should be the same brand too. But since when I am looking at the wheels as all I can see is the spokes that are laced the, for me “wrong” way. I can not see anything else. I know that is exactly what would happen if I mounted the wrong fork. I would only see the errors and after spending the amount of money as I have done. That would be a project that would haunt me for the rest of time. My decision was not easy, but logical. I will save all parts and put it all in a safe place. Perhaps one day I will finish the project. But as it feels now, no. I am tired of the 1935 Hermes.

Then we have the black Pelago. Well that is a sad story. The Pelago path racer I put together from parts that I bought from all over the world, is standing in the basement unused. I made it in a style where you have sit and reach down to the handlebars at an steep angle. My back can not deal with that at all any more. I get a horrible back ache when using the racer, of course I should have known that from the start. But it was such a good look and all parts really came together well. I was hoping all the way that my back could cope with it. Sadly, I will have to sell that one since I can not use it. But there is a person out there that enjoys the Pelago as much as I do, I am sure of it. It is a great bicycle!

Last but not least, there is a new old bicycle standing in the basement at the moment. It is an mid 1930’s Swedish made real iron horse, heavy with a divine roll in the wheels. The paint, mudguards wheels and handlebars are all original, except the saddle and the tires that have been changed due to wear and tear. I have mounted an 1930’s Bosch dynamo and front light so it looks just right now. This is the one real vintage roadster I have being looking after for so many years. It has all details I wanted, oil nipples on front and rear hubs, double legs stand. Undamaged and straight frame, trued wheels, all parts are worn in the same moderate way. The only problem is that is does not have my loved Torpedo rear hub. That would have been to perfect.

Along the way of looking for parts to all old bicycles I got some ornaments that was supposed to be mounted on the front mudguards. They where made by all sorts of different brands, but there was also many “no name” ornaments available back then. You could by them as decoration for your bicycle if the maker never issued one. I have this lovely Pegasus ornament that is lovely in all small details and it is worn in just the right way, the nickel finish has worn off from some parts of the ornament. But it is not damaged.

Now the question is, should I drill a hole in an mudguard from 1930’s to mount a ornament from 1930’s? It is tempting, but at the same time. It would be a shame.

Vintage bicycles, a source of silly problems.

 

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Lack of updates

Dear reader!

I know it have been a lack of updates lately. There is no excuse for me not writing. But perhaps I can offer you some news as compensation?

There is now a date for the “Bike in Tweed 2015” event! The date is set to September 19th. Soon they will start to accept registration for the participants. I will be there, that is sure. This year I waited to plan my vacation until after they released the date. I am looking forward to the event, meeting the other bicycle fanatics that also loves tweed. Perhaps saying hello to some of the people I meet there the last time. Who knows? Perhaps I even might see you there?

This year I am torn between two bicycles. Since the tandem we used the last time is now used by the owner and his wife. She got hooked on the entire bicycle and tweed idea. So that leaves me with two bicycles, the old brown Hermes one. It is a good working horse. Never fails, just keep on going. Then I also have the Pelago racer I build earlier. The advantage with the Hermes is that it got a luggage rack. I know that it is a great idea to bring tea, sandwiches and other bits and pieces in a bag since it is going to be a long day. Bringing things are difficult on the Pelago racer.

Then we have the clothes. With the racer I need to turn up the trousers since It has no chain guard. The Hermes is more a commuter bicycle, simply hop on and ride away. The sad thing with that one is that is in a worn condition, so it is not as a eye catcher as the Pelago racer. Also I need to mend the stand. It is crooked and all rusty, the spring has already broken while using it. Then perhaps I will think of a use for the extra adjustable leaver I found and mounted the handlebars. But it is a long way to September. I will think of something.

Before the Bike in Tweed event comes the summer. I will start my photo project with the Pelago racer. Let us hope that It will work out fine. I will write about any updates about that project here if you like?

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Tweed and bicycles

The theme for 2015 will be tweed and bicycles.

First up is the result of a long time of designing, thinking and putting together a sort of retro/vintage/classic-looking bicycle. It is made of different part from different brands. But the main part is the frame and that ids made by Pelago in Helsinki, so I guess that makes it an Pelago racer. It turned out really nice, the black paint, chrome parts and gold details. I have mentioned it earlier in many different posts. But now it is finished and been out for a test run. The fist impressions are that is is a quick and light weight bicycle. There are some small issues that needs to be adjusted, bolts to be tightened, adjusting the chain and raising saddle and handlebars.

But first, tweed! Later this summer there is a visit to Edinburgh planned for me and a friend. While we are there we will eat haggis, drink beer (perhaps a small whiskey to) and see the town. But more interesting and tweed related, we will take a train ride up to the highlands to look for Harris Tweed cloths. Perhaps I will buy a suit or at least a pair of trousers and a waistcoat that matches the jacket I already got. Then a lunch at the local pub. It will be an interesting journey, I guess there will be a post about the travel to be found later on here on Schneebremse blogg. Complete with images and describing photos of the scenery.

Why this obsession with Harris Tweed? Well that is a difficult question. But the short and simple answer might be that tweed is a classic, durable, great looking cloth. Also the brown Harris Tweed in herringbone pattern coat I got from my father when I was a teenager. He bought the coat at Nordiska Kompaniet in Stockholm in the mid -60’s. He used it back then, but later on it ended up in an closet. When I got it in my teens, the fashion was a bit different. Everyone was using leg warmers and pink slacks or leather jackets with studs. But I used to walk around dressed in suit trousers, white shirt, dark tie and a tweed coat. Of course I had a black umbrella with a bamboo handle when it was raining.  Mind you, this was in the mid -80’s. I guess I was rather along looking odd, dressed like that (sadly no photos exists from that era). But I liked it. It was long before it became “hip” or “cool” to dress like that. After all, one of my biggest heroes at the time was Harry Palmer.
By unfortunate events I lost the coat but before that I got different tweed jacket from different brand. It was in a dogtooth pattern, almost in a black and white “op” pattern style with a lovely ox blood red lining. I used the jacket so much that it literally was falling to pieces many years later. By then I bought a three piece suite in a red-brown herringbone pattern, yellow lined, Donegal Tweed from Ireland. I used it a few times, but never got around to really enjoy it since it was slightly to small.
After that I went back to the Harris Tweed brand by buying a “stock” pre-made jacket in grey herringbone pattern. Now I had found my way back, it feels just right. Perfect fit and the nice contact with the retailer made the jacket a really good purchase.
It all starts and ends with Harris Tweed from the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.

So travelling with train to the Scottish highlands in tweed, buying more tweed is either pure madness, or it can turn out to be a great event and a lovely experience.

Back to the bicycle for a moment. The idea was to replicate an 1930’s path racer bicycle. The style of the turned down handlebars, clean design and “less is more” attitude. I think I got it right, it do not look like any other bicycle on the market today. Not like this. I think I got it right.

Let us go straight to the facts about the new bicycle. Here is an approximately price what I paid for all parts. There might be errors all over, so see it as a rough guide and not as an exact list. I was not aiming for the cheep parts, I just bought the ones that I wanted and had the best design in my opinion. The parts was bought over a long period of time. In the end the total price is about 670 Euro, but I like to adjust it up to 700 just to be safe. It feels more accurate that way.

After it being completed, the weight are 14.3 kilos.

Bike in Tweed 2015, here we go

Parts  Brand Price S/H Total
 Break (front) Cavo, bought at an auction  12  6  18
Grips NOS from -50’s 15 4 19
Grease Mirum 8 8
Frame Pelago Bristol “classic” 275 25 300
Pedals Sylvan Touring Silver 35 35
Saddle Ideale 80 42 6 48
Handlebar NOS from -50’s 7 4 11
Cranks (no name from Australia) 15 6 21
Stem NOS from -70’s 10 4 14
Chain Classic cycle (gold) 18 17 35
Saddle post n/a Bought from a friend, 160
Tires / tubes Swalbe Delta cruiser (same as above)
Wheels / hubs Van Schothorst / Shimano (same as above)
 Total, 669€

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The Pelago Path Racer

Well, I am afraid that I will spoil the big surprise by posting this.

As you know there are one project that I have been working on for a long time. Many other projects has crossed my way since I started searching for parts to my “project”. But now, at last it is finally complete. You might know after reading and following my blog that I, for a long time had an vision to have a old bicycle. But since old bicycles often are in need of constant service, and even sometimes are rare and expensive (I know since I have vintage bicycles too). That made me look for all sorts of modern bicycle brands and models. I realized quickly that modern ones did not quite cut the mustard for me in either design, style or”feel”. After a long search on internet I found that the Finnish made Pelago bicycles was the ones I was looking for. More specific the model the calls “Bristol”. It is a classical looking bicycle in a roadster style, black colour, nice details in lugs and frame work, simple but still vintage looking. While I was looking around and searching I noticed the Pashely Guvnor and was hooked right away by the design of the “path racer” from the -30’s. I started to think how the Guvnor was made, designed and found out that it was just a regular frame slightly changed and modified, but was still keeping the standard look.
I could not stop thinking of the great style of the Path racers and the way Pashely made the Govnor.
After a while I decided to simply build one myself. I just needed a good frame to start with. I started more and more to like the look of an path racer with the turned down handlebars, no mud guards, no chain guard. A really fast looking one, but made with vintage parts. I decided to give it a go and that I would go all the way with this one. It was going to be 100% perfect in my taste. I had time on my hands so there was no rush. The deadline was set so I could enter the Bike in Tweed event for 2014. The Pashely Guvnor was a great inspiration in all the process. But I wanted something different. Something in a more “less is more” style or simply in “my” style. But sadly I could not attend the 2014 event. So everything was put on ice for a moment.
After listening and talking to people I found out that there was going to be an 2015 event of Bike in Tweed. Then I suddenly got about a year to build and finish it to the 2015 event. That became my new goal!

Last summer I visited Pelago while I was on vacation in Helsinki. They was very kind and helped me out with the frame, I also bought the pedals at the Pelago shop (so to be honest the bicycle started out as a pair of pedals). I later bought front and back wheels from a friend that had a set of brand new wheels in spare, he also had an seat post that fitted the Pelago frame that I bought. The saddle, the complete front break system, handlebars and the grips was found on internet auctions.
The stem was an adventure by it self. I found a special made one in United Kingdom that I bought. But that one did not fit the look at all, so I found a old one I had in a locker down in the cellar. That one fitted like a charm. The bell comes from UK and has a lovely tone. I found the crank set in Australia, the chain are from Germany, so are the tires and tubes.
It is an truly international bicycle. But in a European style, perhaps even a Nordic style. So I collected parts for about 6 months for this bicycle, time was not an issue. I had more than a year to get it ready.

Now it is done!

I will present the bicycle better as soon as the winter turns in to spring and the weather is nicer. It is a user bicycle, but I like to take good photos in good conditions. But for now, here is a photo from the hallway. I will also present all the bicycles. It is getting rather confusing now with all projects. At least it is confusing for me.

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