Malmö Tweed Ride 2018

The 15th of September was the date for Malmö Tweed Ride 2018. I decided early that I wanted to attend the Malmö tweed event for the third year in a row.

This year I noticed that the nickname for the event was in Swedish, “sällskapsrundan”. In English it can perhaps be translated to “social gathering route”. The goal for the event is simply to meet other people that are dressed in tweed, while taking a ride on vintage bicycles. Perhaps “promenade bicycling” is a better translating, that is the best way to describe the idea behind the name and the spirit of the event.


By now a international tweed ride veteran. My Hermes from 1956

I decided to again use my old reliable Hermes from 1956. It has been around on many tweed themed events by now. After the trip to Norway a few weeks earlier, the bicycle needed some minor adjustments and service. With a spanner and a screwdriver I fixed all loose nuts and bolts with ease. Also a drop of oil here and there goes a long way.

When using vintage bicycles it is a matter of take a ride for an hour and spend two hours fastening all nuts and bolts that came loose again. Sometimes it even fells like in many vintage communities that you might never even leave the garage. When it is bad weather outside, there is always the possibility to sit inside. Perhaps a Garage Tweed meeting might be a new idea for an event?

For some people the social interaction and the admiration of bicycles is the main reason to keep fixing old bicycles. That goes for clothes to. Many of the riders have original 1930-40’s tweed dresses and suits. They share tips about good Second hand shops and market places. Showing their latest finds and so on. Some crafty riders even creates their own clothes. Finding original 1930’s patterns and sewing entire outfits, now that is impressive! They also looks really great in their beautiful cloths!

I think it is great that those who are interested in vintage clothes and bicycles can express their interest in these tweed bicycle events all over the world together with others. There is no need to have an exclusive car to attend meetings, a bicycle works just as well.


If it was not for the green bus, the photo could been taken in the early 1950’s, Lovely!

The event was held at Gustaf Adolfs torg in central Malmö.  The square was invaded by bicycling tweed-ians. We went around and said hello to old and new friends, everyone admired each others bicycles and tweeds. A few minutes before the start the master of ceremony made an announcement, mentioning that the registration was open and all could register. After checking ours names in their register we were handed this years pin.

Sadly this years pin was in the same as last year. An plastic “punk badge”, not quite as elegant and exclusive as the first ones in metal.


My three pins 2016, 2017, 2018


Gathering and socializing


Cue to registration

Just before we were to set off at 1’a clock. The sky turned dark, a heavy rain swooped in and drenched us all at the start. We all quickly took shelter underneath the trees nearby. The entire day seemed to be a wet occasion.


We took cover underneath the trees during the sudden rain shower

After about 20 minutes the sun came out again and we decided to set off on our “promenade bicycling”. The night before the weather forecast mentioned 16 degrees and cloudy. But with the sun shining it was a lovely Indian summer day, it was 22 degrees and sunny. There I was in my tweed with a cardigan, it was going to be a hot day for me.

The route was new for this year. It was lots of bicycle paths and many red-light crossings over roads. But with it all worked out fine, some cars even gave way for us when they did not need to. Almost everyone was waving and smiling in their cars when we came along.


One of many red-light crossings


Great looking tweed-ians. The bowler hat looks just perfect.

The tea break this year was held in a small park (which name has totally slipped my mind). We were served lovely cucumber sandwiches and refreshing lemonade with oranges. That was really needed. In the background there was music played on an vintage gramophone using old shellac records.

When I was trying to get a nice ambience photo of the riders having a break. I accidentally spilled my lemonade along with the sandwich onto my bicycle and down on the ground. Clumsy me, at least I had a small taste before pouring it all out on my bicycle. Still, very clumsy.


Waiting for lemonade and sandwiches while listening to music


Refreshment break in the sunshine

After the break we started our ride again. Now we were heading towards the railway station and after that down to Västra hamnen (west harbour), close to the seaside. It must have been a sight over about 150 cyclists calmly peddling along the bicycle paths, bicycle bells chiming it all different tunes and riders waving to bystanders.


A short break during a red traffic-light, it could just as easy been back in the 1950’s


Lovely colour matching. Even the dogs collar was in the same plaid pattern as the trousers

 


Photo opportunity

We crossed the finish line at Folkets park and Moriska paviljiongen in central Malmö. After parking our bicycles outside we all went in to the restaurant where there was food and drinks waiting. Inside we were greeted by live music preformed by Swing Street Orchestra, a jazz band that plays old tunes with great spirit and joy.

When entering the restaurant we all got a beer ticket. Eriksberg brewery was sponsor for this tweed ride and treated us all with a beer to the food that was served. Tasty and we could choose beer with or without alcohol.

After eating, drinking, chatting and laughing the master of ceremonies announced that the voting for best dressed man, best dressed lady and best looking bicycle had started. My votes happened to be both winners. The choice for best dressed man was the always handsome and nice Mr Vintagemannen.

Best dressed lady was a girl whose name I did not catch. She got my vote simply because I admire her beret. Such a great look.


Best dressed man, best dressed lady and master of ceremonies


Best looking bicycle, together with the lovely lady who owned the bicycle


May I take a photo – I asked.
Of course, that is why I am dressed like this – she replied.
I never got her name. Mystery lady number 12 (sounds like the title of an Agatha Christie novel)
The mystery is now solved, it is the magnificent Lina

After more mingle and talking with amazing tweed riders, from all over Sweden and internationally. Later that evening, after it was time to say goodbye.

Today I am a bit ashamed, I did not find one rider that I had talked a lot with during the afternoon. I could not thank her for a good company during the day and wish her a safe travel home. I hope she will read this and forgive me.


Heading back to the hotel after a lovely day

I lift my cap! Thank you Malmö. .

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The black bicycle, part 6

As I have mentioned in an earlier post. My first intention was to build the bicycle as a kind of homage to the old bicycle that I remembered from my childhood. An old worn bicycle painted black, reliable and made to be used all year around.

I have built a bicycle that is not like a regular bicycle generally speaking. There are no mudguards, no rear luggage rack to place suitcases or a chainguard. The bicycle also have narrow pedals, not the broad ones that are easy to get a good grip on. To be honest, the bicycle I have created looks more like a 1930’s racer.


The new look…


…is really great

Why then is it not a racer, I hear you ask?  Well, it is painfully simply.

Firstly due to the chain wheel. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I got it from the old bicycle at an auction last year and used it as a donor bicycle for parts that were needed. The chain wheel is a original Crescent wheel. But it is a standard wheel with only 48 teeth.

The sporty Crescent racers from that era used almost all only chain-wheels with 52 teeth. The mission of trying to find a used 52 teeth wheel from 1930’s today, is rather difficult, if not impossible.

Not to mention the problems of finding mudguards that was used on the racers of that era. Or any mudguards that fits the frame and style. I have looked around, asked on vintage bicycle sites, looked in storages of used bicycle shops for a pair of mudguards that fits. Both in size and in style with the Crescent frame. No luck at all so far.


48 teeth chain-wheel with narrow pedals


I used a pair of vintage Nymans made pedals that I had laying in a drawer, they fit the general look

I decided to keep the bicycle as it is. It is not not the black painted vintage bicycle from 1930’s I was longing for. But it is A vintage bicycle from 1930’s, that someone have painted black many years ago.

I fitted the old frame with parts from the 1930’s that I had laying around. Worn parts that fits the style of the bicycle. For example the black painted wooden grips on the handlebar, where the brass is showing beneath the metal plating on the end parts.

The scratched and oxidized bicycle bell on the handlebar is a masterpiece in design by itself with its red and white emblem still intact. Mounted on the frame is an 1930’s battery box made by Berko.  I wound the cloth covered cords around the frame to complete the 1930’s look. From the battery pack, one cord leads to the front light and one leads to the rear light. The entire set up make the bicycle seem to go faster. If not, more dangerous.


Bicycle bell with Lindblads emblem and wooden grip on the handlebar


The 1920’s style square bolt on the stem, the handlebar is modern. It is from 1940’s.


A stem clamp I reused. Made by Wiklunds, a different Stockholm based bicycle maker in the 1930’s.

I replaced the modern Brooks saddle with an old worn vintage saddle with double springs and the classic spring loop in the front. Or a “safety pin” saddle, as they were called back then. By changing the saddle I could use the original “T” shaped seat post from 1930’s. Now the entire bicycle looks like it has been in storage since the early 1930’s.


Look at those impressive springs, this is a very comfortable saddle. Also notice the “t” shaped saddle post

After the work I did on the bicycle, taking every part of the bicycle into pices, pedals, frame, crank-set, front fork all the ball bearings in the crank case and front fork. The same procedure with the front and rear hubs. Clean, lubricate and mount them after checking for wear and tear and adding a small drop of oil on the threads on nuts and bolts.

The black HF-110 Duro tires looks great and having the rear hub sprocket changed along with the chain, tightening screws and adjustments. The bicycle was almost ready. The very last thing I needed to do was to add a small drop of oil to the metal parts on the saddle. They were causing friction and made a irritating squeaking noise whenever I sat on the saddle. We can not have squeaking noises when riding a bicycle. A small drop of oil is often the solution.


Close up of the winded cord along the frame and the Berko headlight

I took a long test ride and tried the bicycle out a few days ago. My first impressions are that it is a really good bicycle. When I was going down a hill, the entire bicycle seemed to transform itself into an arrow. It was travelling straight, fast and silent. The hubs were working like a charm, I must have done a great job when refurbish them. While riding along the streets, the only sound possible to notice from the bicycle was the sound of the tires spinning on the the tarmac.

I think this bicycle is a “keeper” for me. It is a great bicycle after all. But for it to be a really, really great bicycle. I would like to change the front chain wheel to the larger 52 teeth instead of the current one with 48 teeth. Why? Well, a larger front chain wheel looks better and it was they used back then.

It was not bad, for a bicycle created with parts that I had laying around or got fairly cheep. I feel that the old Crescent frame that was made by Lindblads in Stockholm back in late 1920’s got a second chance.

The black bicycle simply become the “Black arrow” in a way. Silent, fast and looking sleek as can be. The quick release nuts on the wheels sure give away that this bicycle will go fast. Everyone knows that a set of wheels with quick release nuts spells “sport” and goes fast, right?


Detail of the rear light, a nice facet shaped glass.

But in fairness, it is not the black bicycle I was looking for. Perhaps the black bicycle of my dreams, is just a dream. Created by memories from the days when my father was taking a ride to visit my grandparents cottage outside the city while I was sitting on the frame and enjoying the breeze.

For me it all is about memories of summer holidays. Eating raspberry’s straight from the bushes while laying in the grass looking at the sky. Listening to the sounds of the forest and the wildlife and riding that black old bicycle.

Perhaps it all should remain as memories, a dream from my childhood. After all, it was many years ago and those long, raspberry eating, summer days will never return.

Perhaps the old black bicycle still exists? Who knows.