Cameras and bicycles, part 5 ”iPhone 5s”

It is time for the last presentation in the series about the cameras that I used on the bicycle photo session a some weeks earlier.

This time I used my own regular mobile phone, an iPhone 5S. It is not only a simple telephone that you can make calls with. It is also an minicomputer, organiser, media player and flash-light. But there is also an very good camera in the phone. The iPhone, or lets us say smart phone since almost every smart phone today got these possibility, got excellent editing possibility with in it self for some after editing.
But with a few simple touches on the screen you can find a large selection of different programs/applications (apps) for photo editing. More of that later in this text.

At the bicycle photo session, after I used the 3 other cameras I mentioned in the earlier posts, the old Kodak box, the Rolleicord and the modern Fujifilm x100. I took out my phone out of my pocket and wiped the lens clean from fingerprints and dust. That is one small but very important thing to do. Grease or smudge on the lens always creates effects that bad. Such as lens flares or an “foggy” look on the photos. The best starting point are a clean image. Then you can let loose you creativity and add what effects you like and create artistic and fun photos later on.
Even lens flares and fog if you like.

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Well, there is no knobs or levers on the “camera” to be honest. Only a few buttons and an touch display. One of the ways you can activate the camera is by pressing the home or sleep button then swipe the camera symbol upwards. There you have the camera all running and reddy to shoot. In that mode you can swipe on the screen at the sides to get video mode or a square frame for the photo. There is other options to. But for now we will go with the standard camera settings. By looking at the screen you compose the photo, the press either the button on the screen (big red button, the shutter) or you press the volume up/down button, remote shutters releases. Then you have taken a photo. As simple as that.

Now when you have taken an photo that you are pleased with. The fun part of editing begins. With almost every smart phone today you have many different options of editing tools and helps. You can choose either with the smart phones own built in effects/filter options. Or you can download for free or buy an app for editing photos. I use the “camera+” app. It costed me a few dollars. But it works for me, I get the results I like.
Beside it is an easy and fun program with many pre set filter options to choose from. There are options for exposure adjustments, tone, colour, contrast and so on.

I will show a few settings how you can change the photo in the smart phone, just for fun.

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Here are some filter options to choose from, there are a few categories of filter styles. Colour, retro, Special, Hollywood and more.

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You can change the tint of the photo, highlights, shadows and even more light settings.

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There is a cropping tool, that make you either choose the crop yourself or use one of the many pre sets crops.


It is fun to take photos with my smart phone! After  The time just runs away and you will end up with even stranger results than intended from the start. Of, course it is a phone. Not a primarily camera. But for all those “on the go” photos and photos for social media like facebook and instagram the smart phone is a really good option. After all, instagram was designed to be used for smart phone photos. There is almost no end to what you can do with the photo. It is like having the entire film laboratory with all skill of the personnel at your finger tips. You take the photo, develop it and then you can get it to any style you like. Things that 20 years ago took many hours of skills and learning to create. There is an entire new way of creating images today. If you with the smart phone connects it to a printer made for phone photos and prints the image you have edited. You only delay is how fast/slow you work with your editing. No more waiting for a developer to do their work for a week or more. Here you got instant result!
Of course the charm of the old cameras has gone in a way. There is perhaps just a matter of simply changing focus. Perhaps there is charm in the modern way of creating photos? After all, everyone is using smart phones today and the best camera in the world “is the camera you have with you” as they say.

In this case, I had my bag with cameras. But when I was going to use the smart phone. I simply picked it up out of my pocket, started the camera, composed the image and pressed on the volume button. Because I use my phone on silent mode, there was no shutter sound (sound playback) As I wrote in last post about the Fujifilm X100 shutter sounds must exist. But here in Europe we can turn it off. So I pressed the shutter release button and…

“……” (no sound at all)

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Cameras and bicycles, part 4 ”Fujifilm X100”

It is time for part 4 in my series about cameras and bicycles.

After using old analogue cameras at the bicycle photo session. I started to use my main camera since 2 years back. The first version of the Fujifilm X100.
The X100 was introduced in 2010 at the Photokina show in September 2010 and become a huge success, both because of the amazing image quality. But also because it was one of the first “retro” cameras that combined a modern thinkiong with a stylish design. But they started to make the camera in larger series first in 2011. I got mine from England in early 2012, it came in a great looking box with original strap, some cables, charger for the battery and so on, of course the camera itself was included.

Now, why did I choose this camera? There are other cameras out there that are equally good or better, more “camera” cameras, with changeable lenses and all that extra everything. For me first of all, the X100 has a fixed prime lens (digital 23mm, that equals to about 35mm in the AOV system). So there is no zoom or anything like that. Second it uses the range finder system. That is when you are taking a photo, you are not looking at the object via the lens. But there is a separate window where you need to adjust the focus in and can compose the image in. It is just like my old Leica M camera, and other earlier 135 small frame cameras (including the Zorki 4K ).

The X100 has a unique feature of being able to mix the view finders real optical vision with a electronic information/frame that also creates a frame for the image, just like old the Leica. So you get all information of the digital camera, but you see the objects in real. Like a heads up display on fighter planes.
There are 2 settings for the view finder:
1, optical and digital. You see everything as a old camera but with the extra digital information
2, pure digital on the screen that pops up in the view finder when flicking the lever on the front of the camera. The extra screen shows the image that the information from the lens gives it also adds the histogram and , just like the regular back display on a digital camera battery status and remaining space on the memory card. With that view you see exactly what you get when pressing the release button.

There is settings for different classical Fujifilm films programmed into the camera. You can choose normal, black and white, different versions of Fuji colour films. For example I have always used the settings in digital cameras that gave me more richness in the colours. In the X100 settings there is an option to simulate the “Velvia” film that Fujifilm developed as an alternative to Kodaks Kodachrome 25 film back in the 1990’s. With this setting the colours are becoming richer and there is more power in the photos. To be honest I am not a big fan of pre-production/editing of photos. Once there was a famous photographer that once said that” he crops the photo in the view finder instead of cropping the photo in the development process”. That quote got stuck with me since I started to take photos and I always tries to take photos like that. What I see, is what I want the image to look like. With the possibility of different colour settings in the camera I most rarely need to adjust the colour tones in the post production.
I only edits the photos when I want a black and white photo. Then I convert the image to black and white, raise the contrast quite a bit. Just to get the feel of grainy b/w photos. The old Kodak TRI-X feeling (witch is impossible to mimic).

Back to the X100. One of the other main advantages with the camera is that the aperture and shutter speeds are placed on knobs that are just like a “real” camera. That is the shutter speed is set with a knob beside the shutter release button. The aperture are set with a ring on the lens, like a real camera. I can very easily choose the settings as I like them and also change then in a quick manner. Both on the aperture and the shutter settings there is an “A” mode, so I do not have to think as much. Of course there is also the other digital advantages like menus, settings and a digital display on the back of the camera.
But for me that have been using a Leica M camera for many years, I used a Pentax SLR camera for a short period. But I used mainly the range finder cameras Leica, Zorki and others. I am used to how they works and all that. It feels comfortable for me.

I remember when using the X100 for the first time, realizing that the zoom is in your feet again. The way I had to bend my knees and crawl on the floor to get the image I wanted. It was just like the olden days, except my knees hurts now, must be of not using them. It can’t be the age showing?
It was a way of taking photos that I had forgotten, but quickly got back to. Sometimes I wish there was a possibility to change lenses. Or even be able to fit my old Russian lenses on the camera, it would be fun. But a classical 35 mm lens is good for so many different things, portraits, landscape, everyday life.
I like the X100 very much, but there is a X100s out there that is even better so I heard. It even got the old focusing prism style range finder so I am told. Did I mention that you can focus by turning on the focusing ring on the X100 lens? It is a great camera!

One of the huge advantages with an digital camera is the storage for the photos. As I mentioned the the 2 earlier parts in the series. The Kodak box had space for 8 photos on one roll of 120 film. The Rolliecord had 12 photos on the same type of film. The digital camera uses a memory card, if you use one with 8 GB space and the settings on the camera are set to medium image quality. Then you can fit 4000 images or there about. There is no need to look at every photo you take, just fire away. Take 3-4 photos more than just one, then save all. You never know when you are going back and looking at the ones that was bad at first look, they might be really good at a second look or when looking at them in the computer. That brings us to the second huge advantage, that is the possibility to look at the images at once. Just press the play button to watch what you just took a photo of. Perhaps when having a photo session with a model, you can show the model straight away the look and your visions of how the result would be. After all, the model never knows what you “see”. With a digital camera you can show in a easy way. So the model understands you and can help you to get that perfect image that all photographers are searching for.

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The “old” look of the Fujifilm X100 is very genuine, especially after I added an twinned leather strap and my soft release button (the big red dot on the top fo the camera). Also on the top you can see the shutter speed selector know, there is a compensation knob to. That ones allows you to force the camera to create darker or lighter photos. Back in the old days you had to calculate that by yourself. On the front of the camera is the lens and a small lever. That lever controls the digital display in the view finder. But it looks like a old rewind lever. On the back there is buttons for the digital menus and an large display.  As an option I bought an UV filter so the lens would be protected against dust and fingerprints. I do not want to cereate scratches on teh lens, so I have always used UV filters. Some say that using a filter like that is distorting the image. If it does, I do not know. But I am not selling my photos, so for me it is no big difference. Then I bought an lens hood. That is one more thing that I always have used, also to prevent scratches and accidental damages to the lens. The camera looks way more cooler too with a lens hood….

After using the vintage cameras I brought out the X100 camera out of the back. The girl was standing by the bicycle waiting. The camera was set to auto on everything. Now there is a silly thing with the camera. I think it is because of a thing I heard a while ago. In Japan it is illegal to take photos with out a shutter sound. So in the menu of the camera there is an option of 3 different settings of shutter sounds. It is not the shutter itself that makes a sound. It is a pre-recorded sound than mimics a shutter. So there are three sounds, all slightly different. “click”, “clock”and “clack” sort of. Very strange. Since the digital camera has no shutter in that way. The only sounds you can hear with taking a photo is the silent whisper when the aperture sets. But it is so silent it is silly, I think a flies cough is louder.

Anyway, I started it up, looked in the view finder and composed the image and pressed the release button.

“click”, or something like that.

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Cameras and bicycles, part 3 ”Rolleicord”

Welcome to part 3 of my series of camera tests.

This time we dive into the 1950’s. The German made Rolleicord camera. Really well made with good optics and very reliable. The Rolleicord is a bit less advanced and valuable version than the more advanced and expensive Rolleiflex. One of the main differences between the two is that the Rolleicord got a winding knob instead of a winding arm, less advanced lenses. But it is still very good quality camera.

This camera was made by Franke & Heidecke in Braunschweig south of Germany back in 1952 and was most likely to be exported to Sweden at that time. Round about 1967 my father bought it because at that time he was going to work as a photographer, so he thought. The idea never came true, but he used the camera on vacations and other occations. In fact he used the camera right up to early 80’s. So all early photos of me is taken with that camera. Then in the 80’s when he bought an East German Practica SLR camera of some sort. By then the old Rollei was put in a cupboard and was soon forgotten.
Many years later on when I started to take photos I asked if I could borrow the old camera. That was no problem. Sadly after all years in the drawer the had been a coating of “fog” between the lenses. But since I was repairing cameras for fun at that time I thought it was a fun project to get his old camera working again.

The camera got two lenses, one that takes the photo and one that you compose the image with. You fold the top up of the camera and looks down on a piece of glass (the view finder) where you see the motive that is in front of you like in a mirror. With the focus knob you adjust the image until what you see in the view finder is sharp. Then you simply take the photo, but first you need to cock the camera before you take the photo. That is done simply by sliding a small lever underneath the bottom lens to the right. Then you hear the shutter mechanics and springs work. To take a photo you press the lever to the left. There is also an mount for a cable release. Back then there was an accessory to the Rolleicord cameras, it was an small trigger that you could mount in the cable release mount so you could use an proper release button instead of sliding the lever back and forth (I had one of these buttons laying around so I mounted that on my fathers camera). Sadly the mirror inside the cameras view finder, the one that projects the view on the glass piece, is so bad that it requires a very bright sunshine to be able to see what you are looking at. Below is an example. I am taking a photo with my iPhone in the view finder. That is what you see on a bright sunny day.

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After fixing the camera up I took many great photos with that old camera, it was with that camera I discovered the fun in taking photos in a medium format. Since I developed and made prints myself it was also cheep and fun. I think I took over 50 rolls of the classic “120” film with my fathers old Rolleicord.  I always used the classic Kodak TRI-X film. In the previous post I mentioned that the standard film in the 30’s was at most ASA 100. The TRI-X was introduced in 1954 (60 years ago this year) and was a mind blowing ASA 400! It became reporters favourite film, it did not need bright sunlight or flashes to produce great images, it was easier to work with. Photos could be taken in low light settings, corspondents found the film very useful and forgiving in harsh enviroemnts. Then the artists discovered the wonderful feeling of the film, the slightly grainy look, the contrast and so on. It became one of the most used black and white films ever used. Sadly it was replaced by other brands and then Kodak changed the formula of the film. But I used TRI-X for a long time. Both in  the”medium” 120 format and the “small frame” 135 format.
Walking around in the city with some cans of TRI-X in my pocket and with my old Leica M2. Just take photos of everyday life. It was fun! But for portraits and more serious photos I used my fathers old Rolleicord until I one day placed the camera back in the cupboard.

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Here you can see the two lenses, the top one are for viewing, the bottom one is taking photos. The knob on the side towards the back of the camera is the film advancing knob. The knob in front of that one is the focus knob. Beside the bottom lens is a small lever, that one sets the shutter speed on the opposite side of the lens is the f stop lever. Just underneath the bottom lens is the cocking lever of the shutter and beside that one is the shutter release button. The round hole on the side of the front is an jack for the flash. The entire top of the camera flips forward and reveals the view finder. To change film you simply unhinge a locking device underneath the camera and flips the entire back of the camera open. Then you can load the 120 film and wind the film until the markings on the film displays the stop markings, you line up the films markings with the markings on the camera. Close the lid, secure the locking device. The advance the film until there is a small “1” turns up and it stops to wind. Set the shutter sped, f-stop. Cock the shutter, open the view finder and there you go. The Rolleicord is reddy for action.

After using the camera this time, about 15 years since last time. I find it a bit difficult to work with. Not that is is an old analogue camera. But I remembered why I stopped using it back then. The film advancing know is an menace. I have big fingers so every time I advance the film I scrape my index finger against the mount for the strap. One can get rather irritated after doing it 20 times in one photo session. Also the cocking of the shutter. After advancing to the next frame you need to also cock the shutter. When having a model in front of you that makes a move or an pose. You need to get a new frame reddy quick.
So to make a long story short. I bought a Rolleiflex. That was the best medium format camera I ever had, and I have used many different brands. All with their advantages and disadvantages. But the Rolleiflex was the best. Small, compact, accurate, quick to reload. Sadly I sold that camera to a friend. But that is a different story. But I still have my fathers old Rolleicord, but just like my father. It stands in a cupboard, in the case. I even got a set of filters and a lens hood in a case.

On the bicycle photo session I found the Rolleicord to be a good camera. Easy to operate and worked really well. Unforutunate I did not have the old TRI-X film. But as I mentioned earlier I had to get hold of some ASA 100 film with short notice from a friend.
The photos are good, but again like the photos that was taken with the Kodak box camera, the negative is scanned in and digitally printed. This time I only got the less quality JPG format on the images. I ordered an CD record as an backup on both occasion. On the Kodak box CD I got two sets of images. One set in JPG format and one set in TIFF format. But this time I got only the JPG format. That is a strange service attitude in my opinion. But I guess that is what happens when there is no services for development or printing of old photos for the everyday amateur.

On the day of the girl with bicycle photo session. I took the camera from the cupboard, took it out of the case, loaded it up. Went to the photo session. Brought out the camera out of the bag that I had all four cameras in, glanced at the light and then adjusted the shutter speed and f-stop as i estimated the light to require. I adjusted the f-stop after the ASA 100 film (I know the ASA 400 settings better). Opened the view finder, adjusted the focus…

“click”

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