Looking back at 2018

It is January 2019!

It feels like it was only a moment ago when I attended all those Tweed events 2018, or was it? At least that is how it feels for me looking back, time moves really fast so it seems. I really hope all readers are well and that 2019 will be a really great year for all of us in every way possible!


2018 started with the Helsinki Winter Tweed event in February

This year as the last year will be a year filled with all sorts of tweed events and bicycling. Among some rides and events, there is the Stockholm Bike in Tweed event in September, Malmö, Gothenburg, Uppsala and Enskede to only mention some in Sweden. If everything goes as planed, I will have some reviews with some great images from odd places to publish during the year on this blog.


One hot Saturday in May I attended the original Tweed Run in London, it was the 10th year anniversary of the event

But to a more serious and a bit sad section in this post. Perhaps an reflection of the situation is a better description for the following text.

I do not have any garage or similar place for storage. Neither am I living at the country side with possibilities to store bits and pieces in cottages or barns. My options for storage at the present is an 2 by 3 meters large (small) basement storage unit. In that space, old things, clothes, “good to have things” and 7 bicycles with parts and tools have to get along.

The reality of the lack of space really struck me when I could not even change an flat tire on one bicycle without rearrange this entire storage unit. An constant game of “that box needs to go there and the bicycle needs to be lifted up and removed-puzzle”. In short I decided to sell some of my bicycles to create space. But also to be able to focus on only 2 or 3 bicycles instead of 8 or 9 bicycles, as I do now.


In the beginning of September I went to Norway and the Fredrikstad Tweed Run for a really lovely event

The lengthy process of selecting which one of my vintage bicycles I wanted to sell was difficult. After all, I have renovated them all and used them in different tweed events. But in the end, after giving it much though, I came to an decision on what to do.

I know a fellow bicycle rider and tweed-maniac that also has some bicycles he want to sell. He fixes up old wrecks and wants to sell some finished ones to get some new projects going. He agreed to help me sell my bicycles this spring. There are not so much money in selling my vintage bicycles. They are not in absolute original or pristine condition. My exaptations to make a profit is very low, as long as someone will enjoy them it is fine.


A few weeks later in September it was time for Malmö Tweed Ride, it was my third time there

In an earlier post, I mentioned the dream for the black bicycle from my childhood. The by now old story of the bicycle my father used when I was a kid. It turns out that the fellow tweedian has an old worn black vintage bicycle, that is fairly complete with all parts. Oddly it happens to be an Stockholm made Crescent from about the years 1927 to 1931. The same years as my black Crescent, that I build from vintage parts. So I think that instead of having almost 10 bicycles standing in my and other basements. I perhaps should focus on those two Crescents instead, one with luggage rack, chain guard and mudguards. The other, a more sporty version.

It feels like that is a way to go. But as always, more updates later on.


In the end of September Stockholm Bike in Tweed was held, sadly that was a rather chaotic and stressful event

To end this post on a positive note. Let us all hope that 2019 will be an eventful year filled with tweed and bicycles for us all. No matter where we are. Besides, an bicycle is modern today. It is environmental friendly, gives health and fresh air (often) and when attending tweed events. Lots of smiles and happiness.

Keep on bicycling!


In October it was 2018 last event, the Enskede Tweed event “Höstrusket” along the vibrant colours of the autumn

 

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The black bicycle, part 6

As I have mentioned in an earlier post. My first intention was to build the bicycle as a kind of homage to the old bicycle that I remembered from my childhood. An old worn bicycle painted black, reliable and made to be used all year around.

I have built a bicycle that is not like a regular bicycle generally speaking. There are no mudguards, no rear luggage rack to place suitcases or a chainguard. The bicycle also have narrow pedals, not the broad ones that are easy to get a good grip on. To be honest, the bicycle I have created looks more like a 1930’s racer.


The new look…


…is really great

Why then is it not a racer, I hear you ask?  Well, it is painfully simply.

Firstly due to the chain wheel. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I got it from the old bicycle at an auction last year and used it as a donor bicycle for parts that were needed. The chain wheel is a original Crescent wheel. But it is a standard wheel with only 48 teeth.

The sporty Crescent racers from that era used almost all only chain-wheels with 52 teeth. The mission of trying to find a used 52 teeth wheel from 1930’s today, is rather difficult, if not impossible.

Not to mention the problems of finding mudguards that was used on the racers of that era. Or any mudguards that fits the frame and style. I have looked around, asked on vintage bicycle sites, looked in storages of used bicycle shops for a pair of mudguards that fits. Both in size and in style with the Crescent frame. No luck at all so far.


48 teeth chain-wheel with narrow pedals


I used a pair of vintage Nymans made pedals that I had laying in a drawer, they fit the general look

I decided to keep the bicycle as it is. It is not not the black painted vintage bicycle from 1930’s I was longing for. But it is A vintage bicycle from 1930’s, that someone have painted black many years ago.

I fitted the old frame with parts from the 1930’s that I had laying around. Worn parts that fits the style of the bicycle. For example the black painted wooden grips on the handlebar, where the brass is showing beneath the metal plating on the end parts.

The scratched and oxidized bicycle bell on the handlebar is a masterpiece in design by itself with its red and white emblem still intact. Mounted on the frame is an 1930’s battery box made by Berko.  I wound the cloth covered cords around the frame to complete the 1930’s look. From the battery pack, one cord leads to the front light and one leads to the rear light. The entire set up make the bicycle seem to go faster. If not, more dangerous.


Bicycle bell with Lindblads emblem and wooden grip on the handlebar


The 1920’s style square bolt on the stem, the handlebar is modern. It is from 1940’s.


A stem clamp I reused. Made by Wiklunds, a different Stockholm based bicycle maker in the 1930’s.

I replaced the modern Brooks saddle with an old worn vintage saddle with double springs and the classic spring loop in the front. Or a “safety pin” saddle, as they were called back then. By changing the saddle I could use the original “T” shaped seat post from 1930’s. Now the entire bicycle looks like it has been in storage since the early 1930’s.


Look at those impressive springs, this is a very comfortable saddle. Also notice the “t” shaped saddle post

After the work I did on the bicycle, taking every part of the bicycle into pices, pedals, frame, crank-set, front fork all the ball bearings in the crank case and front fork. The same procedure with the front and rear hubs. Clean, lubricate and mount them after checking for wear and tear and adding a small drop of oil on the threads on nuts and bolts.

The black HF-110 Duro tires looks great and having the rear hub sprocket changed along with the chain, tightening screws and adjustments. The bicycle was almost ready. The very last thing I needed to do was to add a small drop of oil to the metal parts on the saddle. They were causing friction and made a irritating squeaking noise whenever I sat on the saddle. We can not have squeaking noises when riding a bicycle. A small drop of oil is often the solution.


Close up of the winded cord along the frame and the Berko headlight

I took a long test ride and tried the bicycle out a few days ago. My first impressions are that it is a really good bicycle. When I was going down a hill, the entire bicycle seemed to transform itself into an arrow. It was travelling straight, fast and silent. The hubs were working like a charm, I must have done a great job when refurbish them. While riding along the streets, the only sound possible to notice from the bicycle was the sound of the tires spinning on the the tarmac.

I think this bicycle is a “keeper” for me. It is a great bicycle after all. But for it to be a really, really great bicycle. I would like to change the front chain wheel to the larger 52 teeth instead of the current one with 48 teeth. Why? Well, a larger front chain wheel looks better and it was they used back then.

It was not bad, for a bicycle created with parts that I had laying around or got fairly cheep. I feel that the old Crescent frame that was made by Lindblads in Stockholm back in late 1920’s got a second chance.

The black bicycle simply become the “Black arrow” in a way. Silent, fast and looking sleek as can be. The quick release nuts on the wheels sure give away that this bicycle will go fast. Everyone knows that a set of wheels with quick release nuts spells “sport” and goes fast, right?


Detail of the rear light, a nice facet shaped glass.

But in fairness, it is not the black bicycle I was looking for. Perhaps the black bicycle of my dreams, is just a dream. Created by memories from the days when my father was taking a ride to visit my grandparents cottage outside the city while I was sitting on the frame and enjoying the breeze.

For me it all is about memories of summer holidays. Eating raspberry’s straight from the bushes while laying in the grass looking at the sky. Listening to the sounds of the forest and the wildlife and riding that black old bicycle.

Perhaps it all should remain as memories, a dream from my childhood. After all, it was many years ago and those long, raspberry eating, summer days will never return.

Perhaps the old black bicycle still exists? Who knows.